Blood Meridian: Or the Evening Redness in the West (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 11, 2010 - Fiction - 284 pages
1935 Reviews
"The fulfilled renown of Moby-Dick and of As I Lay Dying is augmented by Blood Meridian, since Cormac McCarthy is the worthy disciple both of Melville and Faulkner," writes esteemed literary scholar Harold Bloom in his Introduction to the Modern Library edition. "I venture that no other living American novelist, not even Pynchon, has given us a book as strong and memorable."

Cormac McCarthy's masterwork, Blood Meridian, chronicles the brutal world of the Texas-Mexico borderlands in the mid-nineteenth century. Its wounded hero, the teenage Kid, must confront the extraordinary violence of the Glanton gang, a murderous cadre on an official mission to scalp Indians and sell those scalps. Loosely based on fact, the novel represents a genius vision of the historical West, one so fiercely realized that since its initial publication in 1985 the canon of American literature has welcomed Blood Meridian to its shelf.

"A classic American novel of regeneration through violence," declares Michael Herr. "McCarthy can only be compared to our greatest writers."


From the Hardcover edition.
  

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5 stars
860
4 stars
487
3 stars
290
2 stars
203
1 star
95

Very violent, brutal; beautiful, spare writing. - Goodreads
Great prose and amazing use of words and imagery. - Goodreads
Blood Meridian was hard to read. - Goodreads
The plot it utterly devoid of character development. - Goodreads
This is a portrayal of violence and evil. - Goodreads
I enjoyed the luscious prose and the adroit symbolism. - Goodreads

Review: Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West

User Review  - Chris Amies - Goodreads

Given his later fondness for WB Yeats titles Cormac McCarthy could just as readily have called this "The Blood-Dimmed Tide" (from "The Second Coming") but that is a title someone else can use. It is ... Read full review

Review: Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West

User Review  - Ryan - Goodreads

The Good: It became apparent very quickly that this is a work of genius. The language is incredible. A picture might tell a thousand words but the reverse isn't necessarily true, however McCarthy's ... Read full review

All 62 reviews »

Contents

I
11
II
25
IV
38
VIII
53
IX
71
XI
80
XIII
100
XVI
109
XXIV
189
XXVI
208
XXVII
228
XXVIII
247
XXIX
261
XXX
284
XXXII
302
XXXIII
311

XIX
123
XX
137
XXI
152
XXII
168
XXXVI
323
XXXIX
345
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 16 - A man's at odds to know his mind cause his mind is aught he has to know it with. He can know his heart, but he dont want to.
Page 31 - ... Meridian met d'ailleurs en scène certains personnages, tel cet emblématique capitaine White, dont les diatribes racistes vis-à-vis des Mexicains reflètent l'état d'esprit des soudards partis écumer le Mexique, invoquant la destinée manifeste des Anglo-Américains pour excuser les pires exactions : What we are dealing with, he said, is a race of degenerates. A mongrel race, little better than niggers. And maybe no better. There is no government in Mexico. Hell, there's no God in Mexico....

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About the author (2010)

Cormac McCarthy was born in Rhode Island in1933 and spent most of his childhood near Knoxville, Tennessee. He served in the U.S. Air Force and later studied at the University of Tennessee. In 1976 he moved to El Paso, Texas, where he lives today.  McCarthy's fiction parallels his movement from the Southeast to the West--the first four novels being set in Tennessee, the last three in the Southwest and Mexico. The Orchard Keeper (1965) won the Faulkner Award for a first novel; it was followed by Outer Dark (1968),  Child of God (1973), Suttree (1979), Blood Meridian (1985), All the Pretty Horses, which won both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award for fiction in 1992, and The Crossing.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bibliographic information