Talking to Alzheimer's: Simple Ways to Connect When You Visit with a Family Member Or Friend

Front Cover
New Harbinger Publications, 2001 - Family & Relationships - 161 pages
4 Reviews

Alzheimer's can have a devastating impact on a patient's close relationships and all too often, family members and friends feel so uncomfortable that they end up dreading visits, or simply give up trying to stay in contact with the patient. This book offers a wealth of practical things you can do to stay connected with the Alzheimer's patient in your life. It offers straightforward suggestions and invaluable do's and don'ts, with advice on everything from dealing effectively with the inevitable repetition that occurs in conversations with an Alzheimer's patient to helpful strategies for saying no to unrealistic demands. It also includes thoughtful tips to remind you to take care of your own feelings and suggestions for helping children become comfortable with visiting an Alzheimer's sufferer.

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Review: Talking to Alzheimer's: Simple Ways to Connect When You Visit with a Family Member or Friend

User Review  - Tonya - Goodreads

I only wish I found this book much earlier, before we had the official diagnois with my Mom. The concepts make sense, and I can see them helping me in conversations and to keep both of our stress levels down. Read full review

Review: Talking to Alzheimer's: Simple Ways to Connect When You Visit with a Family Member or Friend

User Review  - Kiessa - Goodreads

This book has simple aspirations: the author aimed to help people visit loved ones who suffer from memory loss. The book's conciseness and the way it is organized make it a very easy tool. Look here ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
4
Other Conversation Considerations
35
When to Insist When Not to Insist
48
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Claudia Strauss is adjunct professor of English at Albright College in Reading, PA. She coaches individuals with ADD and learning disabilities. She lives in Wyomissing, PA.

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