Outlines of European History ...: From the seventeenth century to the war of 1914, by J. H. Robinson and C. A. Beard (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Ginn, 1916 - Europe
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Contents

The Struggle between France and England in India
101
England France and Spain in America 1750
102
India about 1763
106
J IV
107
CHAPTER PAGE V The Old Regime in Europe 21 Life in the CountrySerfdom
120
The Towns and the Guilds
123
The Nobility and the Monarchy
129
The Catholic Church
134
The English Established Church and the Protestant Sects
137
The Sp1rit of Reform 26 The Development of Modern Science
143
How the Scientific Discoveries produced a Spirit of Reform
148
Reforms of Frederick II Catherine II and Joseph II
161
The English Limited Monarchy in the Eighteenth Century and George III
168
VIL The Eve of the French Revolut1on 30 The Old Regime in France
173
How Louis XVI tried to play the Benevolent Despot
186
VIIL The French Revolut1on
187
How the Estates were summoned in 1789
194
The National Assembly in Paris October 1789 to September 1791
209
France during the Revolution
210
The First French Republ1c
219
The Limited Monarchy 17911792
227
The Revolutionary War
241
Napoleon Bonaparte
248
Bonapartes First Italian Campaign
250
How Bonaparte made himself Master of France
260
The Second Coalition against France
265
Europe and Napoleon 42 Bonaparte restores Order and Prosperity in France
275
Napoleon destroys the Holy Roman Empire and re organizes Germany
281
CHAPTER PAGE 44 The Continental Blockade
289
Napoleon at the Zenith of his Power 18081812
293
Europe at the time of Napoleons Greatest Power about 1810
294
The Fall of Napoleon
301
XIL The Reconstruction of Europe at the Congress
314
of V1enna
319
The Congress of Vienna and its Work 314
325
Thought and Culture at the Opening of the Nine teenth Century
327
Europe after the Congress of Vienna 50 The Restoration in France and the Revolution of 1830
335
Establishment of the Kingdom of Belgium
341
Formation of the German Confederation
343
German Federation 431
346
Louis Napoleon and the Second French Empire
388
XVL Revolut1on of 1848 Austria Germany Italy 62 The Fall of Metternich
392
Failure of the Revolution in Bohemia and Hungary
400
Austria regains her Power in Italy
403
Outcome of the Revolution of 1848 in Germany
406
XVIL The Unification of Italy
411
Italy 18141859
414
Cavour and Italian Unity
417
AustriaHungary since 1866
442
The German Empire
443
The German Constitution
444
Bismarck and State Socialism
450
Germanys Policy of Protection and Colonization Foreign Affairs
456
Reign of William II
457
Trance under the Third Repuhl1c
463
Establishment of the Third French Republic
472
The Separation of Church and State
482
Political Parties in France 4S3 80 Expansion of France
490
XXL Pol1t1cal and Soc1al Reforms in England 81 Parliamentary Reform
495
The British Empire 538
498
The English Cabinet
503
Freedom of Speech and Opinion and Reform of the Criminal Law
507
Free Trade
516
The Irish Question
518
XXIL The Br1tish F mtire in the Nineteenth Century 87 The Extension of British Dominion in India
527
The Dominion of Canada
536
The Australasian Colonies
538
Growth of the British Empire in Africa
542
The Freeing of the Serfs and the Growth of the Spirit of Revolution
556
CHAPTER PACK
562
Turkey and the Eastern Question
574
The European Advance to 1914 in Asia
610
The Partition of Africa
622
Europe in 1914 686
632
XXVL The Twentieth Century in Europe prior to
634
XXVIL Orig1n of the War of 1914
677
AT iENDIX I
695
APPENDIX II
701
INDEX
715
Copyright

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Page 366 - One man draws out the wire, another straights it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business, to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands...
Page 36 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of Parliament...
Page 49 - that according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this Kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 366 - ... the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which in some manufactories are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them.
Page 113 - America, etc., by imposing taxes on the inhabitants of these colonies, and the said act, and several other acts, by extending the jurisdiction of the courts of admiralty beyond its ancient limits, have a manifest tendency to subvert the rights and liberties of the colonists.
Page 208 - The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man ; every citizen then can freely speak, write and print, subject to responsibility for the abuse of this freedom in the cases determined by law.
Page 640 - But all agree, and there can be no question whatever, that some remedy must be found, and quickly found, for the misery and wretchedness which press so heavily at this moment on the large majority of the very poor.
Page 149 - It is to him who masters our minds by the force of truth, not to those who enslave men by violence ; it is to him who understands the universe, not to those who disfigure it, that we owe our reverence.
Page 39 - As soon as he became archbishop he began a series of visitations through his province. Every clergyman who refused to conform to the prayer book, or opposed the placing of the communion table at the east end of the church, or declined to bow at the name of Jesus, was, if obstinate, to be brought before the king's special Court of High Commission to be tried and, if convicted, to be deprived of his position.
Page 504 - He has in reality only the right to be consulted, the right to encourage, and the right to warn.

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