The People's Journal, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Saunders
People's Journal, 1848
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Page 107 - If I do not remember thee, Let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; If I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy. Remember, O Lord, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem ; Who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof.
Page 14 - He paused, as if revolving in his soul Some weighty matter, then, with fervent voice And an impassioned majesty, exclaimed " O for the coming of that glorious time When, prizing knowledge as her noblest wealth And best protection, this imperial Realm, While she exacts allegiance, shall admit An obligation, on her part, to teach Them who are born to serve her and obey ; Binding herself by statute to secure For all the children whom her soil maintains The rudiments of letters, and inform The mind...
Page 107 - O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; Happy shall he be that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us. Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.
Page 271 - I hold another creed; which no one ever taught me, and which I seldom mention; but in which I delight, and to which I cling: for it extends hope to all: it makes Eternity a rest a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. Besides, with this creed...
Page 271 - ... come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies ; when debasement and sin will fall from us with this cumbrous frame of flesh, and only the spark of the spirit will remain, the impalpable principle of life and thought, pure as when it left the Creator to inspire the creature...
Page 271 - Read the New Testament, and observe what Christ says, and how He acts; make His word your rule, and His conduct your example.
Page 270 - Institution," and endeavouring to make out a connection between the first words and the verse of scripture, when the sound of a cough close behind me, made me turn my head. I saw a girl sitting on a stone bench near; she was bent over a book, on the perusal of which she seemed intent: from where I stood I could see the title it was "Rasselas;" a name that struck me as strange, and consequently attractive. In turning a leaf she happened to look up, and I said to her directly: "Is your book...
Page 310 - It is a melancholy truth, that, among the variety of actions which men are daily liable to commit, no less than a hundred and sixty have been declared, by act of parliament, to be felonies without benefit of clergy ; or, in other words, to be worthy of instant death.
Page 270 - ... these, as the dense mist penetrated to their shivering frames, I heard frequently the sound of a hollow cough. As yet I had spoken to no one, nor did anybody seem to take notice of me; I stood lonely enough: but to that feeling of isolation I was accustomed; it did not oppress me much. I...
Page 270 - What is it about?" I continued. I hardly know where I found the hardihood thus to open a conversation with a stranger; the step was contrary to my nature and habits: but I think her occupation touched a chord of sympathy somewhere; for I, too, liked reading, though of a frivolous and childish kind; I could not digest or comprehend the serious or substantial. " You may look at it," replied the girl, offering me the book.

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