My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Jul 25, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 208 pages
21 Reviews
After fifteen years of teaching anthropology at a large university, Rebekah Nathan had become baffled by her own students. Their strange behavior—eating meals at their desks, not completing reading assignments, remaining silent through class discussions—made her feel as if she were dealing with a completely foreign culture. So Nathan decided to do what anthropologists do when confused by a different culture: Go live with them. She enrolled as a freshman, moved into the dorm, ate in the dining hall, and took a full load of courses. And she came to understand that being a student is a pretty difficult job, too. Her discoveries about contemporary undergraduate culture are surprising and her observations are invaluable, making My Freshman Year essential reading for students, parents, faculty, and anyone interested in educational policy.


  

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Review: My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

User Review  - Susan Bazzett-griffith - Goodreads

I need to start letting myself not finish books more often. I was really excited after I ordered this book from my library to get my hands on it, thinking it would be both interesting and bound to be ... Read full review

Review: My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

User Review  - William - Goodreads

Pretty striking how much she didn't know about the way college works on the student side of things. Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
19
IV
41
V
67
VI
90
VII
107
VIII
132
IX
158
X
169
XI
177
XII
181
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About the author (2006)

Rebekah Nathan is a pseudonym for Cathy Small. She has been a professor of anthropology at Northern Arizona University for fifteen years.

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