The Sunday at Home, Volume 43 (Google eBook)

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Religious Tract Society, 1896
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Page 359 - Lord of heaven and earth, dwelleth not in temples made with hands ; neither is worshipped with men's hands, as though he needed any thing, seeing he giveth to all life and breath and all things ; and hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth...
Page 50 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 465 - And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye ' Or how wilt thou (Say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye : and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.
Page 451 - For I spake not unto your fathers, nor commanded them in the day that I brought them out of the land of 'Egypt, concerning burnt offerings or sacrifices : but this thing commanded I them, saying, Obey my voice, and I will be your God, and ye shall be my people : and walk ye in all the ways that I have commanded you, that it may be well unto you.
Page 393 - PRAYER is the soul's sincere desire Uttered or unexpressed; The motion of a hidden fire That trembles in the breast. Prayer is the burden of a sigh The falling of a tear; The upward glancing of an eye, When none but God is near.
Page 219 - Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never fall'; for so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.
Page 100 - Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Wills us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 244 - Hast thou not a heart; canst thou not suffer whatsoever it be; and, as a Child of Freedom, though outcast, trample Tophet itself under thy feet, while it consumes thee ? Let it come, then ; I will meet it and defy it...
Page 54 - Late, late, so late! and dark the night and chill! Late, late, so late! but we can enter still. Too late, too late! ye cannot enter now. 'No light had we: for that we do repent; And learning this, the bridegroom will relent. Too late, too late! ye cannot enter now.
Page 520 - So long as the sun shall warm the earth, let no Christian be so bold as to come to Japan; and let all know, that the King of Spain himself, or the Christian's god, or the great God of all, if he violate this command, shall pay for it with his head.

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