The Lady's Magazine: Or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement (Google eBook)

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Robinson and Roberts, 1829 - Great Britain
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Page 451 - ... languishing faintness, begin to stand and to rest himself ; if the moon should wander from her beaten way ; the times and seasons of the year blend themselves by disordered and confused mixture ; the winds breathe out their last gasp ; the clouds yield no rain ; the earth be defeated of heavenly influence ; the fruits of the earth pine away as children at the withered breasts of their mother, no longer able to yield them relief; what would become of man himself, whom these things now do all serve...
Page 24 - With breathless speed, like a soul in chase, I took him up and ran; There was no time to dig a grave Before the day began: In a lonesome wood, with heaps of leaves, I hid the murdered man!
Page 210 - Veil'd in a simple robe, their best attire, * Beyond the pomp of dress ; for loveliness Needs not the foreign aid of ornament, But is, when unadorn'd, adorn'd the most.
Page 517 - The marriage, if uncontradicted report can be credited, made no addition to his happiness ; it neither found them nor made them equal.
Page 340 - began to think there was more in inquiring into public affairs than I thought of, and that it being a fashionable thing would make me more beloved of my husband, if that had been possible, than I was.
Page 143 - The passage of the Potomac through the Blue Ridge is, perhaps, one of the most stupendous scenes in nature. You stand on a very high point of land. On your right comes up the Shenandoah, having ranged along the foot of the mountain an hundred miles to seek a vent.
Page 25 - Oh, God ! that horrid, horrid dream Besets me now awake ! Again again, with dizzy brain, The human life I take ; And my red right hand grows raging hot, Like Cranmer's at the stake. " And still no peace for the restless clay, Will wave or mould allow ; The horrid thing pursues my soul, It stands before me now ! " The fearful Boy looked up, and saw Huge drops upon his brow.
Page 430 - I first learned to read,' said Stone ; ' the masons were then at work upon your house. I approached them one day, and observed that the architect used a rule and compasses, and that he made calculations. I inquired what might be the meaning and use of these things, and I was informed that there was a science called arithmetic. I purchased a book of arithmetic, and I learned it. I was told there was another science called geometry ; I...
Page 143 - Potomac, in quest of a passage also. In the moment of their junction, they rush together against the mountain, rend it asunder, and pass off to the sea.
Page 304 - tis to shew it That thy coldness makes her do it. Is she silent? is she mute? Silence fully grants thy suit. Doth she pout, and leave the room? Then she goes to bid thee come. Is she sick? Why, then be sure She invites thee to the cure. Doth she cross thy suit with 'No'?

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