A manual of weights and measures ... with rules and tables (Google eBook)

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W.T. Keener, 1885 - Weights and measures - 246 pages
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Page 56 - That the tables in the schedule heretofore annexed shall be recognized in the construction of contracts, and in all legal proceedings, as establishing, in terms of the weights and measures now in use! n the United States, the equivalents of the' weights and measures expressed therein in terms of the metric system...
Page 55 - States to the provisions of this act, the brass troy pound weight procured by the minister of the United States at London, in the year eighteen hundred and twentyseven, for the use of the mint, and now in the custody of th'e mint at Philadelphia, shall be the standard troy pound of the mint of the United States, conformably to which the coinage thereof shall be regulated.
Page 207 - Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York...
Page 67 - C. The deviation from exactness will then be reduced to one-fifth of one per cent., the remainder being less than the exact equivalent sought by only 2.04 grains for every 1000 grains, or about one grain for every ounce.
Page 55 - States, to which the coinage thereof shall be regulated," is the only actual standard or prototype we have. But there is nothing in the statutes defining the value of that standard weight with relation to any unalterable natural standard. If it should be lost destroyed, or injured, another true copy of the British standard Troy Pound would doubtless be obtained to take its place; but this new copy would not be another " standard troy pound of the mint of the United States " until specially declared...
Page 67 - Eeduce each quantity to fluid ounces, and multiply the number by 32. The product is in each case the number of cubic centimetres representing (nearly) the same quantity. One metre is equal to 39.370432 inches. (Captain Clarke.) Hence one cubic centimetre is equal to 0.0610253868 cubic inches, or to 16.2311678 + minims, (there being 61,440 minims in each wine-gallon of 231 cubic inches.) In preparing the above rules 1 cubic centimetre and 15 minims have been considered as equal quantities,...
Page 4 - England, the measure of the king was made; that is to say: that an English penny, called a sterling round, and without any clipping, shall weigh thirty-two wheat corns in the midst of the ear, and twenty-pence do make an ounce, and twelve ounces one pound, and eight pounds do make a gallon of wine, and eight gallons of wine do make a London bushel, which is the eighth part of a quarter.
Page 16 - RULES FOR CONVERTING TERMS OF THE UNITED STATES APOTHECARIES' WEIGHTS AND MEASURES INTO THEIR RESPECTIVE EQUIVALENTS IN TERMS OF THE .METRIC SYSTEM. 1. TO EXPRESS QUANTITIES BY WEIGHT OF THE APOTHECARIES' SYSTEM IN METRIC TERMS, OR TO WRITE MEDICAL PRESCRIPTIONS IN METRIC WEIGHTS.
Page 48 - ... being the weight of one cubic centimetre of distilled water of maximum density under the pressure of one atmosphere. The minim and the grain, however, have no simple relation to each other ; but as the difference between the weight of one minim of distilled water of maximum density under the pressure of one atmosphere, and...
Page 84 - ... minims, or less than 2^ minims for every fluid ounce. The important advantage of a simple relation between the units of weight and the units of measure is acknowledged, and is one of the strong arguments in favor of the metric system, the weight unit or

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