The American Orchardist, Or, A Practical Treatise on the Culture and Management of Apple and Other Fruit Trees: With Observations on the Diseases to which They are Liable, and Their Remedies : to which is Added the Most Approved Method of Manufacturing and Preserving Cider, Compiled from the Latest and Most Approved Authorities, and Adapted to the Use of American Farmers (Google eBook)

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Joseph W. Ingraham, 1822 - Fruit-culture - 226 pages
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Page ii - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the seventh day of May, AD 1828, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SG Goodrich, of the said District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit...
Page 69 - OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISEASES, DEFECTS, AND INJURIES, | IN ALL KINDS OF FRUIT AND FOREST TREES." WITH AN ACCOUNT OF | A PARTICULAR METHOD OF CURE, | PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF GOVERNMENT.
Page 69 - Then take a quantity of dry powder of wood-ashes mixed with a sixth part of the same quantity of the ashes of burnt bones ; put it into a tin box with holes in the top, and shake the powder on the surface of the plaster till the whole is covered...
Page 199 - In the spring, when the blossoms are out, clear away the dirt, so as to expose the root of the tree, to the depth of three inches ; surround the tree with straw about three feet long, applied lengthwise, so that it may have a covering one inch thick, which extends to the bottom of the hole, the...
Page 199 - When the white frosts appear, the straw should be removed, and the tree remain uncovered, until the blossoms put out in the spring. " ' By this process, the fly is prevented from depositing its egg within three feet of the root ; and, although it may place the egg above that distance, the worm travels so slow that it cannot reach the ground before frost, and therefore is killed before it is able to injure the tree.
Page 24 - ... sorts, and not of the old wornout varieties, which latter cannot, in the planting of orchards in common situations, ever form valuable trees, and must end in the disappointment of the planter. Engrafted fruits, I have before said, and I now repeat, are not permanent. Every one of the least reflection must see that there is an essential difference between the power and energy of a seedling plant, and the tree which is to be raised from cuttings or elongations. The seedling is endued with the energies...
Page 115 - It is the practice with some persons to pick apples in October, and first spread them on the floor of an upper room. This practice is said to render apples more durable, by drying them. But I can affirm this to be a mistake. Apples, after remaining...
Page 37 - Cleft-grafting, or slit-grafting, is performed on stocks from one to two inches diameter. The head of the stock being carefully cut off, in a sloping direction, a perpendicular cleft, or slit, is to be made about two inches deep, with a knife or chisel, towards the back of the slope, into which a wedge is to be driven, in order to keep it open for the admission of the scion : the latter must now be cut in a perpendicular direction, and in the form of a wedge, so as to fit the incision in the stock....
Page 69 - Take one bushel of fresh cow-dung, half a bushel of lime rubbish of old buildings, (that from the ceilings of rooms is preferable) half a bushel of wood-ashes, and a sixteenth part of a bushel of pit or river sand...
Page ii - CLERK'S OFFIcE. BE it remembered, that on the eleventh day of November, AD 1830, in the fiftyfifth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Gray & Bowen, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof...

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