The Upstart

Front Cover
Thorndike Press, 1996 - Fiction - 538 pages
8 Reviews
A reliable Cookson production. -- "Kirkus Reviews"
A wealthy tradesman's attempt to climb beyond his station in life reaps tragic consequences for his family when Samuel Fairbrother decides that his new wealth deserve a more imposing residence. His new thirty-four-room mansion cannot buy him the gentlemanly status he craves, and a clash of wills ensues between the master of the house and Maitland, the butler. "The Upstart" is a glowing example of Cookson's ability to capture the conflict of class in the society of late 19th-century England.

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Review: The Upstart

User Review  - Tammy Dillardcowart - Goodreads

I enjoyed this book of a young girl growing into adulthood and falling in love with house staff. Read full review

Review: The Upstart

User Review  - Tammy Cowart - Goodreads

interesting book showing the in England during the late 1800's how new money did not make you as good at the people with old money. Not much has changed in the world has it? Read full review

Contents

Section 1
20
Section 2
38
Section 3
62
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Catherine Cookson, 1906 - 1998 British writer Catherine Cookson was born in Tyne Dock, Co. Durham. She was born illegitimate and into poverty with a mother who was, at times, an alcoholic and violent. From the age of thirteen, Catherine suffered from hereditary hemorrhage telangiectasia. She also believed, for many years, that she was abandoned as a baby and that her mother was actually her older sister. Catherine wrote her first short story, "The Wild Irish Girl," at the age of eleven and sent it to the South Shields Gazette, which sent it back in three days. She left school at the age of thirteen to work as a maid for the rich and powerful. It was then that she saw the great class barrier inside their society. From working in a laundry, she saved enough money to open an apartment hotel in Hastings. Schoolmaster, Tom Cookson, was one of her tenants and became her husband in 1940. She suffered several miscarriages and became depressed so she began writing to help her recovery. Catherine has written over ninety novels and, under the pseudonym of Catherine Marchant, she wrote three different series of books, which included the Bill Bailey, the Mary Ann, and the Mallen series. Her first book, "Kate Hannigan" (1950), tells the partly autobiographical story of a working-class girl becoming pregnant by an upper-middle class man. The baby is raised by Kate's parents and the child believes them to be her real parents and that Kate is her sister. Many of her novels are set in 19th century England and tell of poverty in such settings as mines, shipyards and farms. Her characters usually cross the class barrier by means of education. Catherine received the Freedom of the Borough of South Shields and the Royal Society of Literature's award for the Best Regional Novel of the year. The Variety Club of Great Britain named her Writer of the Year and she was voted Personality of the North-East. She received an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle and was made Dame in 1933. Just shortly before her ninety-second birthday, on June 11, 1998, Catherine died in her home near Newcastle-upon-Tyne. "Kate Hannigan's Girl" (1999), was published posthumously and continues the story of her first novel.

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