Surviving Bipolar's Fatal Grip: The Journey to Hell and Back

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Stl Distribution North Amer, 2007 - Religion - 280 pages
2 Reviews
Despite medical advances, bipolar disorder continues to plague the world with one of
the most challenging and disabling conditions, often with significant misconceptions. Detection, treatment and recovery are possible but the journey is tough and many feel they face it alone. Affecting millions of people worldwide, bipolar disorder causes a person to experience the wildest of euphoria's and the deepest of depressions, sometimes even simultaneously. This tragically leads to a 20% suicide rate, a statistic that David and Diane Mariant are desperately working at lowering. This book offers its readers a powerful account and leaves them with a vivid appreciation of the world of a person suffering with bipolar disorder. This compelling and intriguing combination of personal narrative and cutting-edge research is a unique approach that offers the reader new understandings while de-stigmatizing the disorder and breaking down psychological barriers. It will be of significant value to bipolar sufferers and their loved ones.

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User Review  - ALBI - Christianbook.com

Would be better for someone recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I was diagnosed three years ago, and while I am still struggling, I already knew the basics of the condition. I was hoping this ... Read full review

Review: Surviving Bipolar Disorder's Fatal Grip: The Journey to Hell and Back

User Review  - Diana Pearman - Christianbook.com

Having been treated for Bipolar II Depression for 10 years now, I had an interest in reading about someone else's experience with Bipolar mood disorder. When I started reading the story of David and ... Read full review

About the author (2007)

David and Diane Mariant and their family are part of the escalating statistics - 6 million Americans are affected by bipolar disorder. Of this number, studies show 1.2 million people will commit suicide. They have survived and now have a passion to get new medical information and coping strategies into the hands of those with this difficult disorder and their families who also suffer. Their website www.survivingbipolar.com gives valuable and extensive information for patients and their families. They speak frequently to groups about this escalating, difficult disorder.

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