The R_m_ya_a of V_lm_ki: An Epic of Ancient India. Sundarakāṇḍa

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Princeton University Press, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 583 pages
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The fifth and most popular book of the Ramayana of Valmiki, the Sundarakanda, recounts the adventures of the monkey hero Hanuman in leaping across the ocean to the island citadel of Lanka. Once there, he scours the city for the abducted Princess Siti. The poet vividly describes the opulence of the court of the demon king, Ravana, the beauty of his harem, and the hideous deformity of Sita's wardresses. After witnessing Sita's stern rejection of Ravana's blandishments, Hanuman reveals himself to the princess and restores her hope of rescue. The great monkey then wreaks havoc on the royal park and fights a series of hair-raising battles with Ravana's generals. Permitting himself to be captured by the warrior Indrajit, Hanuman is led into the presence of Ravana, whom he admonishes for his lechery. His tail is set ablaze, but he escapes his bonds and leaping from rooftop to rooftop, sets fire to the city. Taking leave of Sita, Hanuman once more leaps the ocean to rejoin his monkey companions.

This is the fifth volume translated from the critical edition of the Valmiki Ramayana. It contains an extensive introduction, exhaustive notes, and a comprehensive bibliography.

  

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ramayan

Contents

I
1
II
3
III
7
IV
13
V
39
VI
71
VII
75
VIII
79
IX
87
X
99
XI
299
XII
545
XIII
549
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Page 563 - Volume 3 Biography East and West Selected Conference Papers Edited by Carol Ramelb Volume 4 Literary Relations East and West Selected Essays Edited by Jean Toyama and Nobuko Ochner Volume 5 Translation East and West: A Cross-Cultural Approach Selected Conference Papers Edited by Cornelia N.
Page xviii - mumps" y . like the y in "yellow" r like the r in "drama" 1 like the 1 in "lug" v produced generally with just the slightest contact between the upper teeth and the lower lip; slightly greater than that used for English w (as in "wile") but less than that used for English v (as in "vile") like the sh in "shove" s produced with the tongue-tip further back than for s, but giving a similar sound s like the s in "so...

About the author (1996)

Goldman is Professor of Sanskrit at the University of California, Berkeley.

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