The Court and Court Society in Ancient Monarchies

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Antony Spawforth
Cambridge University Press, Oct 4, 2007 - History - 358 pages
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Monarchy was widespread as a political system in the ancient world. This 2007 volume offers a substantial discussion of ancient monarchies from the viewpoint of the ruler's court. The monarchies treated are Achaemenid and Sassanian Persia, the empire of Alexander, Rome under both the early and later Caesars, the Han rulers of China and Egypt's Eighteenth Dynasty. A comparative approach is adopted to major aspects of ancient courts, including their organisation and physical setting, their role as a vehicle for display, and their place in monarchial structures of power and control. This approach is broadly inspired by work on courts in later periods of history, especially early-modern France. The case studies confirm that ancient monarchies created the conditions for the emergence of a court and court society. The culturally specific conditions in which these monarchies functioned meant variety in the character of the ruler's court from one society to another.

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About the author (2007)

A. J. S. Spawforth is Professor of Ancient History at the School of Historical Studies, Newcastle University. His distinguished list of publications includes Hellenistic and Roman Sparta: A Tale of Two Cities (1989, 2nd edition, 2002) [co-author with Paul Cartledge], The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3rd edition (1996, revised 2003) [co-editor with Simon Hornblower and contributor], Greece: An Oxford Archaeological Guide (2001) [co-author with Christopher Mee], The Complete Greek Temples (2006) and The Court and Court Society in Ancient Monarchies (Cambridge University Press, 2007) [editor and contributor].

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