The Australian Protectionist (Google eBook)

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The author, 1877 - Australia - 94 pages
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Page 41 - States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind, on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland ; also in the Gulf of St Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish.
Page 29 - Authority aforesaid, that from and after the twenty-fourth Day of June one thousand seven hundred and fifty, no Mill or other Engine for Slitting or Rolling of Iron, or any Plating forge to work with a Tilt Hammer, or any Furnace for making Steel...
Page 40 - ... of keen recollection; a future war might be expected again to exemplify the mischiefs and dangers of a situation to which that incapacity is still, in too great a degree, applicable, unless changed by timely and vigorous exertion.
Page 30 - And it is not improbable that the raw materials used, and the provisions and other articles consumed, by the manufacturers, create a home market for agricultural products not very inferior to that which arises from foreign demand. A result more favorable than might have been expected from a view of the natural causes which impede the introduction, and retard the progress of manufactures in the United States.
Page 55 - As defence, however, is of much more importance than opulence, the act of navigation is, perhaps, the wisest of all the commercial regulations of England.
Page 17 - The capital which sends British goods to Portugal, and brings back Portuguese goods to Great Britain, replaces by every such operation only one British capital. The other is a Portuguese one. Though the returns, therefore, of the foreign trade of consumption should be as quick as those of the home trade, the capital employed in it will give but one half the encouragement to the industry or productive labour of the country.
Page 5 - It has been said that he who makes two blades of grass grow where only one grew before is a benefactor to his species.
Page 17 - The capital employed in purchasing foreign goods for home consumption, when this purchase is made with the produce of domestic industry, replaces, too, by every such operation, two distinct capitals ; but one of them only is employed in supporting domestic industry. The capital which sends British goods to Portugal, and brings back Portuguese goods to Great Britain, replaces by every such operation only one British capital.
Page 42 - Of all the American plantations, his Majesty has none so apt for the building of shipping as New England ; nor none comparably so qualified for the breeding of seamen, not only by reason of the natural industry of that people, but, principally, by reason of their Cod and Mackerel fisheries ; and, in my poor opinion, there is nothing more prejudicial, and, in prospect, more dangerous to any mother Kingdom, than the increase of shipping in her Colonies, Plantations, or Provinces.
Page 59 - Ireland is the only kingdom I ever heard or read of, either in ancient or modern story, which was denied the liberty of exporting their native commodities and manufactures wherever they pleased, except to countries at war with their own prince or state : yet this privilege, by the superiority of mere power, is refused us in the most momentous parts of commerce...

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