The Origins and Development of African Livestock: Archaeology, Genetics, Linguistics, and Ethnography

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Taylor & Francis Group, 2000 - Business & Economics - 546 pages
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Over the past twenty years, a vast quantity of new information has become available on the origins, development, and current situation of African domestic animals, demanding a new synthesis. The Origins and Development of African Livestock presents an interdisciplinary overview of the origins of African livestock, placing Africa as one of the world centres for animal domestication.
The authors present for the first time syntheses of what archaeozoology and archaeology can tell us about the prehistory of domestic animals in Africa, providing information on livestock distributions over time and including significant information on the development of specific cattle size classes or 'breeds' in prehistory. Current data on the DNA and physical characterization of African livestock, as well as ethnographic and linguistic data complete a biological and cultural view of African domestic animals.

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About the author (2000)

Blench is of the Overseas Development Institute.

Kevin MacDonald is Professor of Psychology at California

Kevin MacDonald is Professor of Psychology at California State University, Long Beach. His research has focused on deState University, Long Beach. His research has focused on developing evolutionary perspectives in developmental psycholoveloping evolutionary perspectives in developmental psychology, certain historical phenomena (e.g., the origins of monoggy, certain historical phenomena (e.g., the origins of monogamous marriage), and ethnic relations. After receiving a Masamous marriage), and ethnic relations. After receiving a Master's degree in evolutionary biology, he received a Ph.D. inter's degree in evolutionary biology, he received a Ph.D. in Biobehavioral Sciences, both at the University of Connectic Biobehavioral Sciences, both at the University of Connecticut. His dissertation focused on behavioral development in wout. His dissertation focused on behavioral development in wolves. He continued developmental research during a post-doctlves. He continued developmental research during a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Illinios, performing reoral fellowship at the University of Illinios, performing research on human parent-child play, particularly rough-and-tusearch on human parent-child play, particularly rough-and-tumble play characteristics of fathers. In the area of developmble play characteristics of fathers. In the area of developmental psychology, he is the author of Social and Personalitmental psychology, he is the author of Social and Personality Development: An Evolutionary Synthesis (Plenum 1988); he iy Development: An Evolutionary Synthesis (Plenum 1988); he is also the editor of two books: Parent-Child Play: Descriptis also the editor of two books: Parent-Child Play: Descriptions and Implications (State University of New York Press 199ons and Implications (State University of New York Press 1993) and the precursor to his current Sage book, Sociobiologic3) and the precursor to his current Sage book, Sociobiological Perspectives on Human Development (Springer-Verlag 1988).al Perspectives on Human Development (Springer-Verlag 1988).

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