A manual of Grecian and Roman antiquities (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Appleton, 1848 - Greece
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Contents

Administration of Justice
34
Religion ib 9 TemplesPriests and ProphessOracles
35
War Offensive and defensive arms
36
The battle
37
CampsSieges
38
Domestic life of the Greeks Means of support Employ ment
39
ArtsCommerce
40
Domestic affairsMarriageEducation
41
Diet
42
Dress
43
Houses
44
SPARTA CHOROGRAPHY yl The Country
45
HISTORICAL OUTLINE 1 Ancient history
46
Administration of Lycurgus
47
The rise of LacedaemonHegemonia ib 4 Decline of Lacedaemon
48
Fall of the Spartan Commonwealth
49
INHABITANTS OF LACSDJEMON 1 Spartans
50
Free inhabitants who were excluded by birth from the rights of citizenship
51
Helots
52
Partition of the land among the free inhabitants
53
Consequences of the gradual decrease in the number of citizens and the inequality of property
54
THE GOVERNMENT yl Partition of the Government
55
The Senate or Council
56
MagistratesThe Kings
57
The Ephori
58
Other public officers
59
ADMINISTRATION OF THE OOVERNMENT 1 Its object
60
Punishments
61
MILITARY AFFAIRS 4 6 The ArmyWeapons of the Soldiers
62
Officers
63
War Battles
64
POLITICAL ECONOMY 11 Income and ExpenditureMoney
65
E OTHER FUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 12 General remarks
66
Marriage ib 14 Public education of Boys
67
Education with reference to the Mind
68
Education of Girls
69
Other modes of sustaining the ancient discipline
70
APPENDIX CRETE Yl Historical sketch of the Country
71
The Constitution
72
1 The Country
73
The Capital
74
HISTORICAL OUTLINE 1 Ancient history of the country The Monarchy and Aristocracy
75
The subject continued
76
Legislation of Draco
77
Increase of popular influence
78
Decline of the constitution
79
INHABITANTS OP THE STATE AND THEIR CLASSIFICATION 1 Citizens by birth
80
Persons admitted into the rank of citizens
81
Metceci
82
Slaves
83
Phylae and Demi
84
Administration of these communities
85
Phratriae and Gene ib 8 Trityes and Naucrariee
86
Proceedings at these assemblies
87
The subject continued
88
Legislative authority of the Assembly Ecclesia
89
The subject continued
90
Ostracism
91
B THE SENATE OR COUNCIL 9 Qualification of Members Privileges
92
Duties of the Senate
93
Manner of assembling
94
THE MAGISTRATES 12 Different Classess of Public Functionaries
95
Responsibility of Magistrates
96
Limits of their power
97
Various Police Functionaries
98
Extraordinary Functionaries
99
LAWS RELATING TO PRIVATE PERSONS 2 Marriage
100
Parental Authority Adoption Guardianship
101
Right of Inheritance and of making a Will
102
Laws relating to Obligations and Securities
103
JUDGES AND COURTS OF JUSTICE 6 Historical account of the Courts of Justice 104
104
The Dieetotae The Forty
105
The Court of the Areopagites
106
Magistrates with Judicial Hegemonia
107
Accusations Qualifications of Plaintiffs
108
Public Prosecutions considered with reference to the subject of Complaint
109
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 18 Legal Proceedings
110
Proceedings before the Court
111
Form of Process in Trials for Murder
112
The subject continued
113
Appeals
114
Punishments ib 26 Atimia ib 27 Other kinds of Punishment
115
Falling off in the Administration of Justice
116
29 The Gods Temples
117
Festivals The Panathenaja and Dionysia ib 31 Thesmophoria Eleusinia and other inferior Festi vals
118
Priests and Worship
119
Dechne of Religion
120
MILITARY AFFAIRS 34 Military service
121
Officers Generals
122
Taziarchs Lochagi Hipparchs Phylarchs Peripol archs
123
The fleet
124
FINANCE 41 ExpenditureCost of Public Worship
125
the Standing Armythe Navy
126
PRIVATE LIFE 1 General remarks
136
Trades ib 3 Same subject continued
137
Same subject continued
138
Same subject continued
139
Physical and moral Training of Boys
140
Same subject continued
141
Same subject continued ib 11 Female Education
142
Meals ib 13 Dress
144
Houses ib 15 Funerals
145
POINTS OF UNION FOR THE WHOLE OF GREECE A FESTIVALS AMI GAMES 1 Local Festivals The great National Festivals
146
The Olympic Games
147
The Pythian Games
148
The Nemean Games
149
Rewards of the Victors
151
The Olympiads and the Computation of Time founded on them
152
B ORACLES ESPECIALLY THE ORACLE OF DELPHI 10 Oracles in generalthe Oracle of Dodona
154
The Oracle of Apollo at Delphi
155
Decline of the Delphi Oracle
156
Other Oracles
157
The Amphictyonie e at Thermopylae and Delphi Their extent object and history
158
Same sobject continued
159
B LEAGUES BETWEEN THE INHABITANTS OF THE SAME DISTRICT 5 Of such Leagues in general
160
Leagues of the Boeotians
161
The Achaean League
162
Constitution of the Achaean League ib 9 The jEtolian League
163
COLONIAL RELATIONS
166
Constitution of the jEtolian League
198
MM
17
INHABITANTS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE
27
Province of the Senate 51
51
Mode of proceeding in the Senate 53
52
MAGISTRATUS 11 History of the Magistracy 53
53
Magistracy of the Republicits character and position 55
55
The subject continued 57
57
Of the authority of Magistrates and its limits 58
58
Consuls Decemviri Military Tribunes with consular authority 60
60
Prators 61
61
Censors 63
63
Curule and Plebeian jEdiles 65
65
QusBstors 66
66
Tribunes of the People 67
67
Inferior Officers j 68
68
Extraordinary Magistrates Dictator Interrei 11 Actus urbi 69
69
Inferior Officers 70
70
Commissioners appointed for special purposes 71
71
Origin of the Legal Codes 73
72
Same subject continuedUnder the Emperors 73
73
Judicia Publics and Privata ib 5 Magistrates 74
74
Indices 75
75
CounselAdvocati 76
76
PRIVATE RIGHTS 9 Qualification 77
77
ClassiBcBtion of Private RightsRights of Things ib 11 Rights of Obligation Obligation by Contract 78
78
Obligation by Delictum 80
80
Priests for the Sibylline Books 127
127
Fetiales 128
128
Haruspices 129
129
Rex Sacrificulus Flamines Curiones ib 16 Communities of Priests for the service of particular deitiesthe Vestals 130
130
Salii Luperci Fratrea Arvales Sodales Titii Galli 131
131
Election of Priests 132
132
Prayers and Vows 133
133
Sacri6ces 134
134
Games 135
135
Holy Places and Furniture 137
137
Division of Time 138
138
CIVIL AND PRIVATE LIFE 1 Private and Domestic Life Education 141
141
Names 142
142
Coinage 143
143
Measures 145
145
Employment of Slaves ib 7 EmploymentsGames 146
146
Buildings and Baths 148
148
Dress 150
150
Meals 152
152
Funerals 153
153
HISTORY OF ROMAN LITERATURE INTRODUCTION 1 Development of Roman Literature 155
155
The Latin Language 156
156
HISTORY OF ROMAN LITERATURE 3 First periodfrom the Building of Rome to the year B c 240 157
157
4 Second periodfrom the year b c 34010 the time of Cicero 158
158
The subject continued 159
159
Poets 160
160
Prose Writers 161
161
Third period From the time of Cicero to the death
162
Augustus 163
163
Poets 164
164
Prose Writers 166
166
Fourth Periodfrom the death of Augustus to the Anto nines 169
169
Poets ib 14 Prose Writers 170
170
Fifth periodfrom the Antonines to the Fall of the Western Empire a n 476 172
172
Sixth period 173
173
APPENDIX 17 The Alphabet Writing Materials Books Libraries 175
175
Inscriptions 176
176
Codices 177
177
Questions 179
179

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Page 222 - NEPOS; With Practical Questions and Answers, and an Imitative Exercise on each Chapter. By THOMAS K. ARNOLD, AM Revised, with Additional Notes, by Prof.
Page v - The recent investigations of philologists and jurists have been extensively, but carefully and circumspectly used. The conciseness and precision which the author has every where prescribed to himself, prevents the superficial observer from perceiving the essential superiority of the book to its predecessors, but whoever subjects it to a careful examination will discover this on every page.
Page 228 - ... perceived. The primitive word is distinguished by a larger type ; and where there are any derivatives from it. they follow in alphabetical order, and the part of speech is append ed, thus furnishing a complete classification of all the connected analogous words of the same species.
Page 225 - Empire and India with an Appendix of important illustrative articles. This portion is one of the best Compends of Ancient History that ever yet has appeared.
Page 218 - ... the interest of the scholar. 2. It is progressive in its nature, the pieces being at first very short and easy, and increasing in difficulty and length as the learner advances. 3. At the bottom of the page constant references to the Grammar are made...
Page 228 - Dictionary was compiled expressly to develop the precise analogies and various properties of the authorized words in general use, by the standard authors and orators who use our vernacular tongue. Exclusive of the large numbers of proper names which are appended, this Dictionary includes four especial improvements and when their essential value to the student is considered, the sterling character of the work as a hand-book of our language instantly will be perceived.
Page 217 - It embraces all the words in common use, and those in science and the fine arts, historical and geographical names, etc., with the pronunciation of every word according to the French Academy, together with such critical remarks as will be useful to every learner. It is published in a form of extreme condensation, and yet contains so full a compilation of words, definitions, etc., as scarcely to leave any thing to be desired.
Page 222 - BOOK. Containing the substance of the Practical Introduction to Greek Construing, and a Treatise on the Greek Particles; also, copious selections from Greek Authors, with Critical and Explanatory English Notes, and a Lexicon. 12mo, 618 pages. A complete, thorough, practical and easy Greek course is here presented. The beginner commences with the
Page v - We no longer meet with the wretched old method, in which subjects essentially distinct are herded together, and connected subjects disconnected, but have a simple, systematic arrangement, by which the reader easily receives a clear representation of Roman life.
Page 225 - Jews with Chronological and Historical Tables and other Indexes. Dr. Henry has appended a new chapter on the History of the United States.

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