Making a Difference: Behavioral Intervention for Autism

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Catherine Maurice, Gina Green, Richard M. Foxx
Pro-Ed, Jan 1, 2001 - Education - 221 pages
1 Review
Making a Difference: Behavioral Intervention for Autism provides practitioners, researchers, and parents with information needed to make decisions about the individuals in their care with autism. Described in the work are the challenges parents face in obtaining effective treatment for their children and how they navigated those challenges. Also included are chapters written by professionals on finding creative and caring means of helping people with autism and their families. Making a Difference combines solid, data-based information with practical problem-solving strategies and is a valuable resource for all who strive to maximize the achievements of individuals with autism.

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Review: Making A Difference: Behavioral Intervention For Autism

User Review  - Melisa - Goodreads

It seemed out-dated & extremely biased.I could manage to read only one chapter. Maybe it gets better. Read full review

Contents

The Search for Effective Autism Treatment Options or Insanity? 77
11
Prompts and PromptFading Strategies for People with Autism
37
Help My Son Eats Only Macaroni and Cheese Dealing with Feeding Problems
51
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

The name Catherine Maurice is a pseudonym. The author is, in real life, the mother of three children, two of whom were diagnosed as autistic. Her best-known book, "Let Me Hear Your Voice: A Family's Triumph over Autism," was published in 1994. It is an uplifting and hopeful account of how her family used a behavior modification method to treat their autistic children. The process, devised by O. Ivar Lovaas, a psychologist in California, seeks to disrupt the repetitive patterns of behavior that so many autistic children exhibit. Maurice's book, although positive and uplifting, cautions readers that this type of therapy works with only about 50% of the children who are treated using it. Nevertheless, both of Maurice's children have fully recovered and are now considered "normal." Catherine Maurice is also the editor of a book entitled "Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Autism: A Manual for Parents and Professionals.

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