The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet

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Billboard Books, 2008 - Music - 256 pages
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This breakthrough series looks at great music from a unique vantage point. By considering the recording session itself, rather than the final album, Legendary Sessions showcases the creative process and all the elements that go into making music that reflected its time, commented on our society, and influenced our culture.



How did these epoch-making sessions come about? What influenced the artists? What was it like to be there as the recording was made? Written by top entertainment journalists, Legendary Sessions answers those questions with an involving you-are-there style. What impact did the recording have? Who listened to it? Who imitated it? Who was inspired by it? Legendary Sessions looks at those questions, too, with groundbreaking interviews, eyewitness accounts, and contemporary commentary.



Innovative and intriguing, Legendary Sessions is sure to change the way music fans listen to the great recordings of our time.



After the release of the Rolling Stones’s psychedelic albumTheir Satanic Majesties Requestin 1967, many feared that the bad boys of rock had sacrificed their raw, bluesy edge to love, peace, and flower power. No need to worry. Salvation was at hand withBeggars Banquet, featuring “Sympathy for the Devil” and “Street Fighting Man.” The album was a storming return to Satanism, social revolution, and celebrations of the working man. Author Alan Clayson explores the social and cultural developments of the time, the ways that the changing dynamics of the band affected the music, and how the songs took shape. From the latest swinging happenings down on Carnaby Street, to who Mick was sleeping with, to what Keith was taking,Legendary Sessions: The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquetis an entertaining trip through rock history.

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Review: Legendary Sessions: The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet (Legendary Sessions)

User Review  - Mike - Goodreads

I don't know what exactly made me think reading about the making of an album would be particularly interesting. The whole first section was about the influences of The Stones, which numerous and ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Alan Claysonhas written more than 30 books, includingBackbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe—The Lost Beatleand biographies of Keith Moon, Led Zeppelin, and each of the Rolling Stones. Visit him on the web at www.alanclayson.com. He lives in London.

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