Shirley

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Wordsworth Editions, 1993 - Fiction - 627 pages
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Following the tremendous popular success of Jane Eyre, which earned her lifelong notoriety as a moral revolutionary, Charlotte Bronte vowed to write a sweeping social chronicle that focused on "something real and unromantic as Monday morning". Set in the industrializing England of the Napoleonic wars and Luddite revolts of 1811-12, Shirley (1849) is the story of two contrasting heroines. One is the shy Caroline Helstone, who is trapped in the oppressive atmosphere of a Yorkshire rectory and whose bare life symbolizes the plight of single women in the nineteenth century. The other is the vivacious Shirley Keeldar, who inherits a local estate and whose wealth liberates her from convention. A work that combines social commentary with the more private preoccupations of Jane Eyre, Shirley demonstrates the full range of Bronte's literary talent.
  

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Contents

Levitical
3
The Wagons
14
in Mr Yorke
27
Mr Yorke continued
34
Hollows Cottage
43
Coriolanus
56
The Curates at Tea
73
Noah and Moses
95
Tomorrow
262
Mrs Pry or
272
xxn TTOO LUCJ
287
XXIH An Evening Out
295
xxrv Tie Ftfey ofAe Shadow of Death
311
The West Wind Blows
327
Old Copybooks
334
The First Bluestocking
349

Briarmains
108
Old Maids
126
Fieldbead
141
Shirley and Caroline
155
Further Communications on Business
173
Shirley Seeks to be Saved by Works
194
Mr Donnes Exodus
205
Whitsuntide
217
The School Feast
226
WfoVvb fte Genteel Reader is Recommended to Skip Low Persons being here Introduced
239
A Summer Night
248
XXVIH Phoebe
368
Louis Moore
385
Rush edge a Confessional
392
Uncle and Niece
404
The Schoolboy and the Woodnymph
417
xxxm Martins Tactics
427
xxxrv Case of Domestic Persecution Remarkable Instance of Pious Perseverance in the Discharge of Religious Duties
436
Wherein Matters Make some Progress but not much
442
Written in the Schoolroom
453
The Windingup
471
Copyright

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The Flesh Made Word
Helena Michie
Limited preview - 1990
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About the author (1993)

Charlotte Bronte, the third of six children, was born April 21, 1816, to the Reverend Patrick Bronte and Maria Branwell Bronte in Yorkshire, England. Along with her sisters, Emily and Anne, she produced some of the most impressive writings of the 19th century. The Brontes lived in a time when women used pseudonyms to conceal their female identity, hence Bronte's pseudonym, Currer Bell. Charlotte Bronte was only five when her mother died of cancer. In 1824, she and three of her sisters attended the Clergy Daughter's School in Cowan Bridge. The inspiration for the Lowood School in the classic Jane Eyre was formed by Bronte's experiences at the Clergy Daughter's School. Her two older sisters died of consumption because of the malnutrition and harsh treatment they suffered at the school. Charlotte and Emily Bronte returned home after the tragedy. The Bronte sisters fueled each other's creativity throughout their lives. As young children, they wrote long stories together about a complex imaginary kingdom they created from a set of wooden soldiers. In 1846, Charlotte Bronte, with her sisters Emily and Anne published a thin volume titled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. In the same year, Charlotte Bronte attempted to publish her novel, The Professor, but was rejected. One year later, she published Jane Eyre, which was instantly well received. Charlotte Bronte's life was touched by tragedy many times. Despite several proposals of marriage, she did not accept an offer until 1854 when she married the Reverend A. B. Nicholls. One year later, at the age of 39, she died of pneumonia while she was pregnant. Her previously rejected novel, The Professor, was published posthumously in 1857.

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