Journal of a Tour in the Levant, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1820 - Middle East
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Page 99 - The only spot in it which has now any cultivation, or is indeed worth any, is a small valley on the west, where the richer inhabitants have a few gardens. Its coast is high, and consists of a collection of capes, which form so many ports, some of which are excellent. The only one in use, however, is a deep gulf on the northeast of the island, sheltered by high mountains on every side but one, where it is protected by a projecting cape. The island produces...
Page 370 - ... the unfortunate offspring of their fellow creatures. These men may truly be said * to strain at a gnat and swallow a camel.' There is no accounting (as Mr. Bryant observes) for the infatuation of nations, and the inconsistency of their practices. .The Phenicians, who were so liberal of man's blood, would not hurt a cow ; and the Carthaginians held it worse than sacrilege to maim an ape. No certain information was procured by Major Walker as to the number of female infants annually destroyed among...
Page 496 - ... which enters a hole made for it in the door-post, and is there fastened by small bolts of iron wire, which fall from above into little orifices made for them in the top of the lock. The key is a long piece of wood, having at the end small pieces of iron wire of different lengths, irregularly fixed in, corresponding in number and direction with the bolts which fall into the lock : these it lifts upon being introduced into the lock, which it then pulls back. The bolts of wire differ in number from...
Page 84 - ... of seats remaining, but covered with soil, or enveloped in bushes. On the left wing is an inscription in very large and well-formed characters, ranging in a long line, and recording certain donations to Bacchus and the people. Beneath, near the bottom, are several stones inscribed, but not legible. By the isthmus is the vaulted substruction of a considerable edifice ; and on a jamb of the doorway are decrees engraved in a fair character, but damaged, and black with smoke ; the entrance, which...
Page 399 - C'est leur félicité que Dieu ait permis qu'il y ait dans le monde des Turcs et des Espagnols, les hommes du monde les plus propres à posséder inutilement un grand empire.
Page 223 - ... 1st. In a commanding situation, immediately above the Grecian camp, two miles and a half from the embouchure of the Scamander, and one mile and a half in a direct line from the sea, stood the city of New Ilium, which Lysimachus fortified, and which afterwards became a Roman colony. But...
Page 190 - It is curious to observe the gradual disuse of Greek among the Greeks, produced by the change of their residence. In Greece the Turks speak only Greek ; in Constantinople the Greeks speak both Greek and Turkish, but only the former to each other ; in Asia Minor, along the coast, they can speak Greek when addressed in it, but talk Turkish to each other. And in the interior parts of Asia Minor, they know no other language than Turkish.
Page 333 - Caelum non animum mutant, qui trans mare currunt. Strenua nos exercet inertia ; navibus atque Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis, hie est, Est Ulubris, animus si te non deficit aequus.
Page 105 - ... famous and long-dreaded pirate was settled in them, and a calm he said was just the weather to fear in. As we approached Samos however he became more cheery, and at seven o'clock we anchored in a large bay at the SE extremity of the island. Friday, January 5th. — This bay, we saw at daylight, was sheltered on the north by high mountains, on the east by a projecting cape, on the west by an extensive plain, and on the south imperfectly by the ruins of a mole. This was not the only sign of its...
Page 223 - Ilium, which Lysimachus fortified, and which afterwards became a Roman colony. But, 2dly, forty stadia, or five miles eastward of New Ilium, was a remarkable hill, which even in the days of Strabo retained its Homeric appellation of Callicolone, and whose base Was watered by the Simo'is. And it was between these two points, ten stadia from the Callicolone, and thirty from New Ilium, that the village stood which was supposed to mark the site of the ancient capital of Priam.

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