Active tectonics: earthquakes, uplift, and landscape

Front Cover
Prentice Hall, 2002 - Nature - 362 pages
1 Review
Active Tectonics is a carefully organized, easily understandable book. Extremely current throughout, this book thoroughly explores the effects of earthquakes and active tectonic systems on humans, geomorphic systems, and Earth's topography. Complete with numerous case studies in a variety of regions, the very latest advances in the field, separate quantitative techniques boxed sections, and a host of pedagogical aids. This comprehensive book focuses on new advances in the technology and new applications to geology and tectonics. Increased material on Quaternary chronology, including lichen chronology and micro stratigraphy of desert varnish. New studies, including research in the Olympic Mountains, Nepal, Australia, Taiwan, the Himalaya, and the New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States. New techniques such as cosmogenic surface-exposure dating, argon and helium geobarometry and geothermometry, regional hyposometric analysis using digital elevation models, geodetic positioning, and coupled geodynamical computer simulations of topographic evolution are covered. Covers a number of regions with case studies including: Alaska; Pacific Northwest; California; The basin and range; Midwest; and East Coast. Ideal for beginning readers in active tectonics, geomorphology and natural hazards. This book may also be of interest to city planners, seismic engineers, and other non-geologists.

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Contents

Active Tectonics
3
Magnitude and Intensity of Earthquakes
11
Seismic Waves
19
Estimation of Seismic Risk
27
Effects of Earthquakes
33
The Earthquake Cycle
39
Summary
46
Landforms Tectonic Geomorphology and Quaternary Chronology
49
Relic Mountain Fronts
149
INTRODUCTION
155
Active Tectonics and Rivers
157
Active Tectonics and Coastlines
191
Coseismic Deformation
198
Active Folding and Earthquakes
223
Paleoseismology and Earthquake Prediction
267
Mountain Building
313

Geodesy
87
Geomorphic Indices of Active Tectonics
122
MountainFront Sinuosity Smf
134
An Example of a Deformed Alluvial Fan
141
Appendix A
347
Index
359
Copyright

About the author (2002)

Edward A. Keller Ed Keller is a professor, researcher, writer, and most importantly, mentor and teacher to undergraduate and graduate students. Currently, Dr. Keller's students are working on earthquake hazards, how waves of sediment move through a river system following disturbance, and geologic controld on habitat to endangered southern steelhead trout. He was born and raised in California (Bachelor's degree in Geology and Mathematics from California State University at Fresno, Master's degree in Geology from University of California at Davis), it was while pursuing his Ph.D. in Geology from Purdue University in 1973 that Ed wrote the first edition of "Environmental Geology," the text that became the foundation of the environmental geology curriculum. Ed joined the faculty of the University of California Santa Barbara in 1976 and has been there since, serving multiple times as the chair of both the Environmental Studies and Hydrologic Science programs. In that time he has been the author on over 100 articles, including seminal works on fluvial processes and tectonic geomorphology. Ed's academic honors include the Don J. Easterbrook Distinguished Scientist Award, Geological Society of America (2004), Quatercentenary Fellowship from Cambridge University, England (2000), two Outstanding Alumnus Awards from Purdue University (1994, 1996), A Distinguished Alumnus Award from California State University at Fresno (1998), the Outstanding Outreach Award from Southern California Earthquake Center (1999). Ed and his wife Valery, who brings clarity to his writing, love walks on the beach at sunset and when the night herons guard moonlight sand at Arrroyo Burro Beach in Santa Barbara. Robert H.Blodgett Bob Blodgett is Professor of Geology at Austin Community College in Austin, Texas, where he teaches natural hazards and disasters, environmental, physical, and historical geology, as well as environmental science, and manages the college's Edwards Aquifer monitoring well and is physical sciences safety coordinator. Bob has nearly 25 years of teaching experience, including positions on the faculties of Ohio State University and Dickinson College. He is a Licensed Professional Geoscientist and worked for six years in the state of Texas Public Drinking Water Program leading a team of scientists evaluating the vulnerability of drinking water to contamination, and for two years at the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology conducting environmental assessments of abandoned mined lands. His research on terrestrial sedimentary processes resulted in published papers on braided streams, ancient soils, and fossil burrows. Bob has practical experience planning for and responding to natural hazards. While in the Air Force he served as the disaster preparedness officer for the remote Indian Mountain Air Force Station in Alaska, and for the underground Cheyenne Mountain Command post of the North American Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs. He traces his interest in natural hazards back to Alma Petrini, his second grade teacher in Detroit, whose lesson on volcanoes and earthquakes came alive with stories and pictures of her trips to Paricutin and Pompeii, and to lava samples that Gordon Macdonald, then director of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, sent him for his class project. These experiences led to a life-long interest in geology including three degrees, a B.S. from the University ofWisconsin at Madison, an M.S. from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Bob and his partner Jeff, who helps him focus on the important things in life, enjoy traveling, exploring new restaurants, and making a home with their dog Mona.

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