Himalayan Tribal Tales: Oral Tradition and Culture in the Apatani Valley

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BRILL, 2008 - Social Science - 281 pages
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This study of an oral tradition in northeast India is the first of its kind in this part of the eastern Himalayas. A comparative analysis reveals parallel stories in an area stretching from central Arunachal Pradesh into upland Southeast Asia and southwest China. The subject of the volume, the Apatanis, are a small population of Tibeto-Burman speakers who live in a narrow valley halfway between Tibet and Assam. Their origin myths, migration legends, oral histories, trickster tales and ritual chants, as well as performance contexts and genre system, reveal key cultural ideas and social practices, shifts in tribal identity and the reinvention of religion.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
A History of Change
27
Tales
55
Myths and Histories
107
Ritual Texts
159
Comparisons Local Culture and Identity
213
Appendices
251
Glossary
267
Bibliography
269
Index
279
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Stuart Blackburn, Ph.D. (1980) in Folklore and South Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley

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