Raise Your Social I.Q.: How to Do the Right Thing in Any Situation

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Carol Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1998 - Social Science - 253 pages
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In this modern stress-filled time, people face many awkward situations: the dating scene with all its pitfalls; gay relatives "coming out"; friends going through grief and loss; job difficulties and other personal problems: the woes of love, friendship, and profession.

To avoid gaffes and goofs and other embarrassments, we need to bring our social I.Q. into the twenty-first century. This book defines manners and etiquette for how we live today and shows readers how to keep their mouths foot free.

Among the topics covered:
-- How to mix business and social relationships
-- Thank-you notes and why they are indispensable
-- E-mail versus snail mail (guess which one is better)
-- How to behave on the first date
-- Being a teacher, a healer, a minister
-- Racism, politics, and sex
-- RSVP or else!
-- The Ten Commandments of social I.Q.

The book includes a social I.Q. test -- the author dares readers to improve their score before the "final exam", given at the end of the book. Raise Your Social I.Q. shows readers how to live better, happier, and nicer, and to help rid the planet of incivility.

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Contents

Why Is Etiquette Necessary?
3
The Office
34
Dating
52
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Michael Levine spent a total of 25 years working undercover for four federal agencies. As an agent for the Drug Enforcement Administration for 23 years, Levine would ultimately bring about the arrests of approximately 3,000 criminals, by posing as priests, Colombian and Puerto Rican drug merchants, and a mob leader. In this manner, he was able to corral millions of drug money dollars. As a Jew growing up in a Hispanic neighborhood in South Bronx, New York City, Levine grew up pretending to be Puerto Rican and speaking fluent Spanish. Despite a couple of pre-adulthood arrests, he joined the U.S. Air Force. Later came marriage and the earning of an accounting degree at Hofstra University, an education financed through tending bar and playing saxophone. After graduation, he moved to the U.S. Treasury Department; this was followed by a stint in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. Michael Levine survived impersonating drug dealers but he also faced the drug wars at home. He tried to get his brother David to kick the heroin habit by having him move into his home with Levine, his wife, and his family, but David would later commit suicide. Levine's daughter faced drug trouble as well. She was removed from the family through a court petition, but she later rejoined them. Michael Levine has chronicled life as a federal agent in such books as Deep Cover. He enjoys walks with his wife Laura Kavanu and dog in Ulster County, N.Y.

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