The Monthly Review (Google eBook)

Front Cover
R. Griffiths., 1791
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Editors: May 1749-Sept. 1803, Ralph Griffiths; Oct. 1803-Apr. 1825, G. E. Griffiths.
  

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Page 306 - Neither the few nor the many have a right to act merely by their will, in any matter connected with duty, trust, engagement, or obligation. The constitution of a country being once settled upon some compact, tacit or expressed, there is no power existing of force to alter it, without the breach of the covenant, or the consent of all the parties.
Page 232 - Peace as is aforesaid, for setting to work the Children of all such whose Parents shall not by the said Churchwardens and Overseers, or the greater Part of them, be thought able to keep and maintain their Children...
Page 422 - The composition being thus made, care must be taken to prepare the tree properly for its application, by cutting away all the dead, decayed, and injured part, till you come to the...
Page 402 - I sucked, seemed to favour my mother's dream ; for, as she has often told me, I threw away my rattle before I was two months old, and would not make use of my coral till they had taken away the bells from it. As for the rest of my infancy, there being nothing in it remarkable, I shall pass it over in silence.
Page 22 - Sweet drop of pure and pearly light! In thee the rays of Virtue shine ; More calmly clear, more mildly bright, Than any gem that gilds the mine.
Page 36 - acknowledged them ; nor will a multitude of common speakers authorise any pronunciation which is reprobated by the learned and polite. As those sounds, therefore, which are the most generally received among the learned and polite, as well as the bulk of speakers, are the most legitimate...
Page 1 - Hiftory of America, into the knowledge which the Ancients had of India, and of confidering what is certain, what is obfcure, and what is fabulous, in the accounts of that country which they have handed down to us.
Page 77 - ¡a each powder-mill, wherein ufually only twenty are ufed, and he beats only ten pounds of powder with each mortar. The expence of copper mortars is very confidcTabJe, « each mortar cons twenty pounds ; but then the mills are certainly lefs liable to accident ; and if blown up, the mortars are recovered.
Page 185 - The first settler in the woods is generally a man who has outlived his credit or fortune in the cultivated parts of the State.
Page 23 - Nor avarice sends him forth in quest Of climes beneath the sun. Short is our span ; then why engage In schemes for which man's transient...

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