Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (Google eBook)

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Branden Books, 1989 - Poetry - 60 pages
2 Reviews
Philosopher, astronomer and mathematician, Khayyam as a poet possesses a singular originality. His poetry is richly charged with evocative power and offers a view of life characteristic of his stormy times, with striking relevance to the present day. This translation by Peter Avery and John Heath-Stubbs is beautifully and lavishly illustrated in colour with numerous examples of Persian miniature painting. It also contains a valuable introduction and several appendices, including an essay on Persian painting.
  

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Even though I have heard that the translation exceeds the original (a statement I can not verify), this is one of the finest works of the the English language. With alternating sentiments between the passions of love and drink deeply for tomorrow we die. This is the one book I would take to a desert island.
Edwin Thomasson
Summanulla Books
 

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Fantastic read. Depth in each quatrain. I love almost all translations of Rubaiyat and Fitzgerald has done great.

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About the author (1989)

Known in Iran as a leading mathematician, Omar gained literary importance through certain quatrains that were translated by Edward FitzGerald. The Ruba'iyat is justly famous in English translation. Others besides FitzGerald have tried their hand at translating it, not all with admired results. Bowens's is a good example of competent and pleasing work.

Edward FitzGerald (March 31, 1809-June 14, 1883), English man of letters. A dilettante and scholar, FitzGerald went to Trinity College, Cambridge, and spent most of his life living in seclusion in Suffolk. His masterpiece, a translation of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, appeared anonymously in 1859 and passed unnoticed until Dante Gabriel Rossetti made it famous. Revised editions followed in 1868, 1872, and 1879. FitzGerald's Rubaiyat has long been one of the most popular English poems. Although actually a paraphrase rather than a translation of a poem by the 11th-century Persian poet Omar Khayyam , it retains the spirit of the original in its poignant expression of a philosophy counseling man to live life to the fullest while he can. Among FitzGerald's other works are Euphranor (1851), a Platonic dialogue, and Polonius (1852), a collection of aphorisms.

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