History of California, Volume 22 (Google eBook)

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History Company, 1886 - California
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Page 193 - House dissenting) had declared that " by the act of the Republic of Mexico a state of war exists between that Government and the United States...
Page 589 - ... into the Union of the United States and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States) to the enjoyment of all the rights of citizens of the United States...
Page 484 - The garrison of four presidios of Sonora concentrated within the walls of Tucson, gave us no pause. We drove them out, with their artillery, but our intercourse with the citizens was unmarked by a single act of injustice. Thus, marching half naked and half fed, and living upon wild animals, we have discovered and made a road of great value to our country.
Page 611 - The termination of the war left an existing government, a government de facto, in full operation ; and this will continue, with the presumed consent of the people, until Congress shall provide for them a territorial government. The great law of necessity justifies this conclusion. The consent of the people is irresistibly inferred from the fact that no civilized community could possibly desire to abrogate an existing government, when the alternative presented would be to place themselves in a state...
Page 346 - Griffin, were doing well, and the General enabled to mount his horse. The order to march was given, and we moved off to offer the enemy...
Page 611 - In the mean time the condition of the people of California is anomalous, and will require, on their part, the exercise of great prudence and discretion. By the conclusion of the treaty of peace, the military government which was established over them under the laws of war, as recognized by the practice of all civilized nations, has ceased to derive its authority from this source of power.
Page 197 - States and will take the oath of allegiance; and to "assure the people *of those provinces that it is the wish and design of the United States to provide for them a free government, with the least possible delay, similar to that which exists in our territories. They will be called upon to exercise the rights of freemen in electing their own representatives to the territorial legislature.
Page 235 - I declare to the inhabitants of California that, although I come in arms with a powerful force, I do not come among them as an enemy to California; on the contrary, I come as their best friend, as henceforward California will be a portion of the United States...
Page 339 - A party of the enemy being reported in our vicinity, it was first determined that Capt. Moore should take 60 men and make a night attack; but for some reason the general altered his mind, and sent Lieut Hammond with the men to reconnoitre.
Page 248 - A vast cloud of dust appeared first, and thence in long file emerged this wildest wild party. Fremont rode ahead, a spare, activelooking man, with such an eye ! He was dressed in a blouse and leggings, and wore a felt hat. After him came five Delaware Indians, who were his bodyguard, and have been with him through all his wanderings; they had charge of two baggage horses.

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