The sensibilities and will (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1869 - Psychology
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

All objects not equally fitted to cause these emotions
52
A susceptibility of emotions of beauty an ultimate principle of our mental constitution
53
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
54
Original or intrinsic beauty The circle
56
Of the beauty of straight and angular forms
57
Of square pyramidal and triangular forms
59
The variety of the sources of that beauty which is founded on forms illustrated from the different styles of architecture
60
Of the original or intrinsic beauty of colours
61
Further illustrations of the original beauty of colours
64
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
65
Illustrations of the original beauty of sounds
66
Further instances of the original beauty of sounds
69
The permanency of musical power dependent on its being in trinsic
71
Of motion as an element of beauty
72
Explanations of the beauty of motion from Karnes
73
Of intellectual and moral objects as a source of the beautiful
74
associated beauty 39 Associated beauty implies an antecedent or intrinsic beauty
75
Objects may become beautiful by association merely
76
Further illustrations of associated feelings
77
Instances of national associations
79
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of hu man happiness
80
Of fitness considered as an element of associated beauty
81
Of utility as an element of associated beauty
82
Of proportion as an element of associated beauty
83
Relation of emotions of beauty to the fine arts
85
Differences of original susceptibility of this emotion
86
Summary of views in regard to the beautiful
88
Of picturesque beauty
89
esthetic emotions emotions of sublimity 52 Connexion between beauty and sublimity
90
The occasions of the emotions of sublimity various
91
Great extent or expansion an occasion of sublimity
92
Great height an element or occasion of sublimity
93
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
94
Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions
95
Of motion in connexion with the sublime
96
Indications of power accompanied by emotions of the sublime
97
Of moral worth in connexion with sublimity
98
Sublime objects have some elements of beauty
99
Emotions of grandeur
100
Considerations in proof of the original sublimity of objects
101
Influence of association on emotions of sublimity
102
Further illustrations of sublimity from association
103
Definition of taste and some of its characteristics
104
Distinguishable from mere quickness of feeling or sensibility
105
Section Pc
106
Instantaneousness of the decisions of taste
108
Of the permanency of beauty
109
General nature of emotions of the ludicrous
110
Occasions of emotions of the ludicrous
111
Of Hobbesaccount of the ludicrous
112
Of what is to be understood by wit
113
Of wit when employed in aggrandizing objects
114
Of other methods of exciting emotions of the ludicrous
115
Of the character and occasions of humour
116
Of humorous descriptions as modified by disposition
117
Of the practical utility of feelings of the ludicrous
118
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
119
Emotions of melancholy sorrow and grief
120
Emotions of dissatisfaction displeasure and disgust
122
Emotions of regard reverence and adoration
123
PART FIRST NATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SENSIBILITIES NATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SENTIMENTS CLASS SECOND THE DESIRES TH...
125
nature of desires 89 Of the prevalence of desire in this department of the mind
127
Of the place of desires in relation to other mental states
128
Of an exception to the foregoing statement
130
The desires characterized by comparative fixedness and per manency
131
Desires always imply an object desired
132
Of variations or degrees in the strength of the desires
133
Classification of this part of the sensibilities
134
The principles based upon desire susceptible of a twofold operation
135
Of the instincts of man as compared with those of the infe rior animals
136
Of the nature of the instincts of brute animals
137
Instincts susceptible of slight modifications
139
Instances of instincts in the human mind
140
Further instances of instincts in men
142
Of the final cause or use of instincts
143
Section Pupa 106 Of the general nature and characteristics of the appetites
144
The appetites necessary to our preservation and not original ly of a selfish character
145
Of the prevalence and origin of appetites for intoxicating drugs
146
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the appetites
147
Chap IV propensities 111 General remarks on the nature of the propensities
148
Principle of selfpreservation or the desire of continued ex istence
149
Of the twofold action of the principle of selfpreservation 150 114 Of curiosity or the desire of knowledge
151
Further illustrations of the principle of curiosity
152
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the principle of curiosity
154
Imitativeness or the propensity to imitation
155
Practical results of the principle of imitation
156
Of emulation considered as a propensive principle
158
Of approbativeness or the desire of esteem as a rule of con duct
160
Of acquisitiveness or the desire of possession
161
Of the moral character of the possessory principle
162
Of perversions of the possessory desire
164
Facts in proof of the natural desire of power
165
Of the moral character of the desire of power
167
Of the twofold action of the propensity to truth
168
Propensity of selflove or the desire of happiness
169
Of selfishness as distinguished from selflove
171
Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers
173
propensities continued sociality or the desire OF SOCIETY 134 The principle of sociality original in the human mind
174
The principle of sociality not selfish
175
Reference to the doctrine of Hobbes on this subject
176
The doctrine of an original principle of sociality supported by the view that it is necessary to man in his actual situation
177
Of the principle as it exists in the lower animals
178
The existence of the principle shown from the conduct of children and youth
179
The same shown from the facts of later life
180
The social principle exists in the enemies of society
181
Proofs of the natural desire of society from the confessions and conduct of those who have been deprived of it
182
Further proofs and illustrations of the natural origin of the principle of sociality
184
Other illustrations of a similar kind
185
Other instances in illustration of the same subject
187
The subject illustrated from experiments in prison discipline
188
Relation of the social principle to civil society
190
Of the form of desire denominated hope
191
the malevolent affections Section Prjj 150 Of the comparative rank of the affections
192
Of the complex nature of the affections
193
Of resentment or anger
194
Illustrations of instinctive resentment
195
Uses and moral character of instinctive resentment
196
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to it
197
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions 199 158 Modifications of resentment Peevishness
203
Modifications of resentment Revenge
205
Nature of the passion of fear
207
the benevolent affections 164 Of the nature of love or benevolence in general
208
Love in its various forms characterized by a twofold ac tion
209
Of the parental affection
210
Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection
211
Of the filial affection
212
The filial affection original or implanted
213
Illustrations of the filial affection
215
Of the nature of the fraternal affection
217
Of the utility of the domestic affections
218
Of the moral character of the domestic affections and of the benevolent affections generally
219
Of the moral character of the voluntary exercise of the be nevolent affections
221
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
222
Of humanity or the love of the human race
223
Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate hu manity or love of the human race
225
Proofs of a humane or philanthropic principle from the exist ence of benevolent institutions
227
Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine
229
Objection from the contests and wars among mankind
231
The objection drawn from wars further considered
233
Illustration of the statements of the foregoing section
234
Of patriotism or love of country
236
Of the affection of friendship
237
Of the affection of pity or sympathy
239
Of the moral character of pity
240
Of the affection of gratitude
241
Man created originally with the principle of love to God
243
That man was originally created with a principle of love to God further shown from the Scriptures
244
Further proofs that man was thus created
246
On the twofold action of the principle of divine love
247
power of the will
248
Relation of the principle of supreme love of God to the oth er principles of the pathematic sensibilities
249
Illustration of the results of the principle of love to God from the character and life of the Saviour
250
Section Pap
251
Of habits in connexion with the appetites
257
Objection to these views in respect to habit
263
PART SECOND THE MOEAL SENSIBILITIES OR CONSCIENCE
269
Proofs of a moral nature from the terms used in different lan
275
Evidences of a moral nature even among Savage nations
283
Concluding remarks on the general fact of a moral nature
289
Section p 225 Changes in the moral emotions take place in accordance with changes in the antecedent perceptions
293
Of objects of moral approval and disapproval
294
Of the original ground or basis of moral approbation and dis approbation
296
Emotions of moral approval are called forth in connexion with the existence of right or rectitude in the things ap proved of
298
Of the doctrine which confounds reasoning and conscience
299
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
300
Illustration of the preceding section
301
Further illustrations of the same subject
302
Remarks upon the case stated in the foregoing section
303
Of the training or education of the conscience
304
Of guilt when a person acts conscientiously
305
A degree of moral sublime in acts of strict and undeviating integrity or justice
317
Other instances of the sublimity of justice
318
Instances of friendship and the parental affection illustrative of the subject
319
Of the moral sublimity of great benevolent undertakings
320
The spirit of forgiveness in some cases sublime
322
PART SECOND THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES OR CONSCIENCE MORAL OB CONSCIENTIOUS SENTIMENTS CLASS SECOND FEELINGS O...
325
existence of obligatory feelings 250 Feelings of moral obligation distinct from feelings of moral approval and disapproval
327
Further proof from the conduct of men
328
Further proof from language and literature
329
Further proof from the necessity of these feelings
331
Section Viga
332
Further considerations on this subject
338
Of diversities in moral judgment in connexion with differ
344
Of the effect of wrong speculative opinions among heathen
350
Of the existence of a moral nature in connexion with public
357
immutability of moral distinctions
363
Application of the foregoing views to the doctrine of the
369
of individuals and from the character of codes of law and civil institutions
377
moral education
388
Further remarks on the same subject
394
Of the importance of correct morals in connexion with
400
Disordered action of the principle of selfpreservation
406
Further remarks on the disordered action of the social pro
412
e 315 Of the disordered action of the desire of esteem
413
Disordered action of the desire of power
415
Disordered action of the principle of veracity
416
sympathetic imitation 318 Of sympathetic imitation and what is involved in it
418
Familiar instances of sympathetic imitation
419
Of sympathetic imitation in large multitudes 420
420
Of the animal magnetism of M Mesmer in connexion with this subject
421
Instances of sympathetic imitation at the poorhouse at Haer lem
423
Other instances of this species of imitation
424
Application of these views to the witchcraft delusion in New England
425
Practical results connected with the foregoing views
426
Application of these views to legislative and other assemblies
427
disordered action of the affections 327 Of the states of mind denominated presentiments
428
Of sudden and strong impulses of mind
430
Insanity of the affections or passions
432
Of the mental disease termed hypochondriasis
433
Of intermissions of hypochondriasis and of its remedies
435
Disordered action of the passion of fear
437
Perversions of the benevolent affections
438
Nature of voluntary moral derangement
440
Of accountability in connexion with this form of disordered conscience
441
Of natural or congenital moral derangement
442
Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital mor al derangement
444
casual associations in connexion with the sensi bilities 338 Frequency of casual associations and some instances of them
445
Of association in connexion with the appetites
446
Of casual associations in connexion with the propensities 447 341 Other instances of casual association in connexion with the propensities
448
Inordinate fear from casual associations
449
Casual associations in respect to persons
450
Casual association in connexion with objects and places
451
Of casual association in connexion with particular days
453
Antipathies to animals
454
DIVISION THIRD THE WILL VOLITIONAL STATES OF THE MIND OR VOLITIONS PART FIRST GENERAL NATURE AND RELATIONS O...
457
relation of the intellect to the will Section Page 1 General relation of the will to the other departments of the mind
459
The intellectual part the foundation or basis of the action of the other parts of the mind
460
The connexion of the intellect with the will
461
The connexion of the understanding with the will shown from
462
its connexion with action
463
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
464
Nature of the connexion between the intellect and will
465
Opinions of Locke and Mackintosh on this point
467
Power of will and intellect not perfectly correspondent to each other
468
An energetic will sometimes found in connexion with limited powers of intellect
470
Introductory statement
471
Of the division or classification of the sensibilities
472
Acts of the intellect in immediate proximity with emotions
474
Emotions not in proximity with volitions
475
Emotions followed by desires and obligations
476
Desires in proximity with the will
477
Obligatory feelings also in proximity with the will
478
Further remarks and illustrations on this subject
479
Of the strength of the desires
480
Of the strength of feelings of obligation
482
Necessity of the controlling power existing in the will
483
Remarks on the nature of the will
485
Of the nature of the acts of the will or volitions
486
Volition never exists without some object
487
Section Page
489
Probable cause of confounding desires and volitions
495
Volition may exist in respect to those complex acts which
502
Of the chastisements of God inflicted on those he loves
508
Of the importance of the topics now entered upon
514
An argument thus furnished in favour of laws of the will
520
Inferred also from the application of rewards and punish
526
Section Page
527
The prescience of God taught in the Scriptures
533
Foresight of men in respect to the conduct of others
539
Proof from the regularity observable in the commission
546
Statement of other laws that are involved in the constitution or nature of the will itself
552
The character of motives depends in part on the constitution
559
nature of mental freedom
565
Statement of the inquiry in this chapter
574
Objected that the foregoing views are necessarily and in their
580
Evidence of the freedom of the will from consciousness
586
Evidence of freedom of the will from feelings of approval
592
Section Pag 121 Evidence of the freedom of the will from languages
599
Evidence of the freedom of the will from the control which every man has over his own motives of action
600
The freedom of the will further shown from the attempts of men to influence the conduct of their fellowmen
602
Argued further from the view taken in the Scriptures
603
Practical importance of the doctrine of liberty
604
consistency of law and freedom 128 Objected that the views maintained are contradictory
607
Denial of the alleged contradiction
609
Admission of inexplicableness or mystery
610
Of the limited powers of the human mind
612
We find things which cannot be explained everywhere
613
Illustrated from the influence of men over each other
614
Opposite supposition attended with equal difficulty
615
The doctrine of the wills freedom equally important with that of its subjection to law
616
enthralment or slavery of the will 138 Of the occasions of mental enthralment
617
Inability to define enthralment or slavery
618
The nature of mental enthralment illustrated by a reference to extorted promises
619
Illustration of the same subject from cases of torture
621
Historical illustrations of the subject
622
The will enthralled by the indulgence of the appetites
624
Enthralment of the will occasioned by predominant and over ruling propensities
625
The will enthralled by inordinate ambition
626
The will enslaved by the indulgence of the passions
627
Inordinate intensity of the domestic affections
628
Of the slavery of the will in connexion with moral accounta bility
630
POWER OF THE WILL
633
nature of mental power 149 Of the distinction between liberty and power
635
Proof of the distinction between liberty and power
636
Distinction of power and liberty involved in the fact of our being able to form abstract ideas of power and liberty
637
Further shown from the possession of a moral nature
638
Origin of the idea of power in intuition or suggestion
639
The idea of power involves the reality of power
640
Of power as an attribute of the human mind
641
Further shown by a reference to the divine mind
642
Section Paffe 159 Proof of power in the will from the analogy of the mind
644
Proof of power in the will from internal experience
645
Proved from the ability which we have to direct our atten tion to particular subjects
646
Of power of the will as exhibited in patience under suffering
648
Illustration of the subject from the command of temper
649
Further illustration of this subject
650
Proved from the concealment of the passions on sudden and trying occasions
651
Further instances of concealment of the passions
652
Illustrated from the prosecution of some generalplan
653
Subject illustrated from the first settlers of NewEngland
655
Illustrated by the fortitude exhibited by Savages
656
differences of volitional power 172 Differences in volitional power seldom noticed
657
Remarks on constitutional weakness of the will
658
Of comparative or relative weakness of the will
659
Instances of want of energy of the will
660
Remarks on great strength of the will
662
Energy of the will as shown in imminent danger
663
Energy of the will as shown in martyrdoms
665
Subject illustrated from two classes of public speakers
666
Power of the will requisite in the military and other arts
668
Energy of the will requisite in the men of revolutions
669
Practical application of these views
670
consistency of character 184 Connexion of the will with consistency of character
671
Illustrations of the inconsistent character
673
Of individuals remarkable for consistency of character
674
Of the value of consistency in the religious character
676
Of the foundation or basis of consistency or inconsistency of character
677
Of inconsistency of belief in connexion with inconsistency of conduct and character
679
Selfpossession an element of consistency of character
680
Perseverance under changes of circumstances a second ele ment
681
Consistency implies a control over the passions
682
discipline of the will 194 Importance of a due discipline of the Will
684
A due balance of all the powers the most favourable state of things to the just exercise of the will
685
Of the culture of the appetites propensities and passions as auxiliary to the discipline of the will
687
Some instances and proofs of the foregoing statements
689
Importance of repressing the outward signs of the passions
691
Of enlightening the intellect in connexion with the discipline of the will
693
Further remarks on the same subject
696
Section Pace
697
Of strengthening the will by religious considerations
703

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information