The Politics of Women's Biology

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Rutgers University Press, Jan 1, 1990 - History - 229 pages
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"Exposing the ideological bases of the medical/scientific information (and disinformation) we receive, Hubbard . . . gives us a book sophisticated in its analysis but accessible in its style." --Ms. Magazine For a range of historical and contemporary issues in eugenics, human evolution, and procreative technology, Ruth Hubbard explains why scientific descriptions and choices should not generalize human, or female, attributes without acknowledging the realities of people's lives. Sophisticated in its analysis, yet not at all technical in its exposition, this book will find a wide readership among feminists, the general public, and the scientific community.
  

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Contents

Part One How Do We Know?
7
Part Two What Do We Know?
67
Part Three How Do We Use It?
141
Technologies
147
Prenatal Technologies and the Experience
161
Who Should and Who Should Not Inhabit
179
Some Final Thoughts 309
209
Index
223
Copyright

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