Rosalind Franklin and DNA

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 221 pages
7 Reviews
Rosalind Franklin's research was central to the Nobel Prize?inning discovery of DNA's double-helix structure. Known only as the bossy, unfeminine "Rosy" in James Watson's The Double Helix, Franklin never received the credit she was due during her lifetime. In this classic work Anne Sayre sets the record straight.
  

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Review: Rosalind Franklin and DNA

User Review  - Gabrielle Gouch - Goodreads

Sayre's book is an essential contribution to the history of the discovery of DNA. I read James Watson's The Double Helix about two decades ago. His version of how the structure of DNA was discovered ... Read full review

Review: Rosalind Franklin and DNA

User Review  - Marion - Goodreads

I am so frustrated that I can only find one biography on this great scientist. This is a small book and it is not the most absorbing read but I am grateful that someone has chosen to write her story. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

An Introduction
15
Rosalind
25
Paris
67
The Problem
76
One Cannot Explain These Clashes of Personality
94
The Making of a Discovery
108
She Was Definitely Antihelical
120
On the One Hand a Defeat On the Other a Triumph
137
Winner Take All
156
What She Touched She Adorned
168
The Last Chapter
182
Afterword
188
Notes
201
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Anne Sayre was a well-known journalist and a close friend of Rosalind Franklin's.

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