The Stamp Act Crisis: Prologue to Revolution

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UNC Press Books, Jan 1, 1953 - History - 327 pages
5 Reviews
The Stamp Act, the first direct tax on the American colonies, provoked an immediate and violent response. The Stamp Act Crisis, originally published by UNC Press in 1953, identifies the issues that caused the confrontation and explores the ways in
  

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Review: The Stamp Act Crisis: Prologue to Revolution

User Review  - Taylor Stoermer - Goodreads

For a half-century this book has been the best overview of the Stamp Act crisis from the American perspective. I don't see that changing in another half-century. It begs, however, for a British companion or transatlantic synthesis. Read full review

Review: The Stamp Act Crisis: Prologue to Revolution

User Review  - Noah - Goodreads

I read this book over the summer for an American history class and learned a lot. I was expecting the same standard for the subsequent books we read. No one, however, was even able to approach the Morgans. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Absolute Authority and Inalienable Right
1
Prologue
3
Francis Bernard Royal Governor
6
The Sugar Act
21
John Robinson Collector of Customs
41
The Stamp Act
54
Daniel Dulany Pamphleteer
75
Resolution
92
Direction Sons of Liberty
187
Patterns of Loyalty
215
Thomas Hutchinson
217
Jared Ingersoll
230
John Hughes
248
Revolution Delayed
269
Repeal
271
Conclusion
293

Road to Revolution
123
Action Boston Sets the Pace
125
Contagion Riots and Resignations
150
Nullification Ports and Courts
165
Epilogue
308
Index
315
Copyright

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About the author (1953)

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Edmund Morgan spent most of his youth in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was educated at the Belmont Hill School, Harvard, and the London School of Economics. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1942 and three years later began his teaching career at the University of Chicago.From there he moved first to Brown University and then to Yale, where he became Sterling Professor in 1965 and emeritus in 1986. Morgan's historical writings greatly enhance our understanding of such complex aspects of the American experience as Puritanism, the Revolution, and the relationship between slavery and racism. At the same time, they captivate readers in the classroom and beyond. His work is a felicitous blend of rigorous scholarship, imaginative analysis, and graceful presentation. Although sometimes characterized as the quintessential Whig historian, in reality Morgan transcends simplistic categorization and has done more, perhaps, than any other historian to open new and creative paths of inquiry into the meaning of the early American experience.

The late Helen M. Morgan was Eward S. Morgan's wife and collaborator.

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