Chasing Birds Across Texas: A Birding Big Year

Front Cover
Texas A&M University Press, Oct 1, 2003 - Nature - 254 pages
0 Reviews
On the morning of January 1, 2000, Mark T. Adams started counting birds. His goal was to find the largest possible number of species in one year in Texas, an undertaking known in birding parlance as a Big Year. By the evening of December 31, he had tied the record of 489 species seen or heard within the state’s borders in a single calendar year. Traveling 30,000 miles across Texas by car and 18,000 miles by plane, Adams alone saw 92 percent of all bird species reported in the state in 2000.

In Chasing Birds across Texas, Adams invites birders and others with a broad interest in the outdoors to join him in exploring Texas’ varied habitats on his quest for birds—from the upper coast to the lower coast; into the Hill Country, the Panhandle, and the Chihuahuan Desert; and up the Davis, Chisos, and Guadalupe Mountains. As he happily celebrates the bounty of the Valley’s spring migration or desperately searches for a Panhandle rarity, we watch him grow as a naturalist, exult in the Texas landscape, and benefit from the company of some of the world’s best birders.

Informative, inspiring, and great fun, Chasing Birds across Texas conveys as perhaps no other bird book can the humor, obsession, dedication, and adventure that are all part of the sport of birding.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Birth of a Birder and a Texas Big Year
xxii
Starting Close to Home
19
The Rio Grande Valley in Winter
29
Pursuing Varied Thrush
41
Home and Away Games
48
Northeast Texas Rarities
58
A Long Weekend in the Pineywoods
65
Big Year Nemesis Number One Painted Redstart
72
Into the Gulf of Mexico
141
Among Butterflies and Friends
148
Red Birds in August
153
Adventures while Chasing a Longtailed Jaeger
157
Welcoming the Invaders
162
Studies in Pain American GoldenPlover and Yellow Rail
173
Two West Texas Gifts
181
Of Owls and Cranes
187

Dawn at the Lek
76
Into the Ooze
84
Spring Migration
89
The Road to Four Hundred Species
103
West Texas Bounty
114
Late Spring in the Rio Grande Valley
122
Strategies and Surprises
129
Big Year Nemesis Number Two Louisiana Waterthrush
137
Frantic December Days
190
Chasing to the End
202
Reflections on a Texas Big Year
214
Texas Big Year Species List
221
Other Species Seen in Texas in 2000
241
INDEX
247
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxi - Checklist and English Names of North American Butterflies, 2nd edition (Morristown, NJ: 2001).

About the author (2003)

Mark T. Adams is an astronomer by trade and works at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia. He serves as subregional director for the Trans-Pecos for North American Birds, published by the American Birding Association, and conducts Breeding Bird Survey counts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Bibliographic information