Domestic Homeopathy (Google eBook)

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J. Harding, 1839 - Homeopathy - 250 pages
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Contents

I
vii
II
xxxi
III
1
IV
28

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Page xxi - ... opposed by the faculty, till every one else was convinced of their importance. An implicit faith in the opinions of teachers, an attachment to systems and established forms, and the dread of reflection, will always operate upon those who follow medicine as a trade. Few improvements are to be expected from a man, who dreads that he might * Domestic Medicine, xiii. ruin his character by even the smallest deviation from the established rule.
Page xviii - If we compare the good which half a dozen true disciples of Esculapius have done since their art began, with the evil which the immense number of doctors have inflicted upon mankind, we must be satisfied that it would have been infinitely better for mankind if medical men had never existed.
Page xix - We can hardly refuse our assent to the observations of the late Sir Gilbert Blane, that in many cases patients get well in spite of the means employed; and sometimes when the practitioner fancies he has made a great cure, we may fairly assume the patient to have had a happy escape.
Page xx - Our Materia Medica is nothing but an industrious collection of the delusive observations that physicians have made in all ages." Dr. Kruger Hanson, a no mean authority, says: "Medicine, as is now practiced, is a pestilence to mankind; it has carried off a greater number of victims than all the murderous wars have ever done.
Page xxi - Faculty, till everyone else was convinced of their importance. An implicit faith in the opinions of teachers, an attachment to systems and established forms and the dread of reflections, will always operate upon those who follow medicine as a trade. Few improvements are to be expected from a man who might ruin his character and family by even the smallest deviation from an established rule.
Page xix - In most cases, the proverb is true, that the remedy is worse than the disease, and the doctor more dangerous than the disorder. The history of medicine confirms it: every method and system has made a greater number of victims than the most contagions epidemics and the longest wars.
Page xvi - I am certain apothecaries are not in condition to read it, and that dangerous mistakes, in consequence of this, may often happen. But suppose the apothecary ever so capable of reading the physician's prescription, he is generally otherwise employed, and the business of making up prescriptions is left entirely to the apprentice. By this means, the greatest man in the kingdom, even when he employs a first-rate physician, in reality trusts his life into the hands of an idle boy, who has not only the...
Page 180 - Arsenic is one of the most prominent agents of cure against intermittents. When the chills and fever are not distinctly developed, when they alternate, or commingle with each other, also, when the heat is burning, likewise disagreeable to the touch and attended by great agitation and almost inextinguishable thirst, Arsenic will exhibit its remedial efficiency. Arsenic demands a preference over all other remedies when the fever presents a form peculiarly characteristic of this remedy ; for example...
Page 181 - ... accession of the fever, or when they first appear and are succeeded by and unite with the fever, or when the fever is accompanied by symptoms which do not appertain to it, as lively anxiety, buzzing in the ears, twitching in the limbs, etc. Arsenic is not less efficient in those fevers where, immediately after the chill, an inclination to vomit or a bitter taste in the mouth is observed ; when the taste of aliments and drink is extinguished, without a constant continuance of a bitter or disagreeable...
Page 180 - ... accidental symptoms already existing, but feebly developed, augment at the accession of the fever, or when they first appear and are succeeded by and unite with the fever, or when the fever is accompanied by symptoms which do not appertain to it, as lively anxiety, buzzing in the ears, twitching in the limbs, etc. Arsenic is not less efficient in those fevers where, immediately after the chill, an inclination to vomit or a bitter taste in the mouth is observed ; when...

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