Moby-Dick, Or, The Whale

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1979 - Fiction - 576 pages
16 Reviews
This trade edition of Moby-Dick is a reduced version of the Arion Press Moby-Dick, which was published in 1979 in a limited edition of 250 copies and has been hailed as a modern masterpiece of bookmaking. It was hand set under the supervision of one of America's finest book designers and printers. The initial letters that begin each chapter were designed especially for this book and christened "Leviathan." The illustrations, of places, creatures, objects or tools, and processes connected with nineteenth-century whaling, are original boxwood engravings by Massachusetts artist Barry Moser. The text of Moby-Dick used in this edition is based on that used in the critical edition of Melville's works published by the Northwestern University Press and the Newberry Library.

This reduced version is smaller in size than the Arion edition and the California deluxe edition, but it includes all of the original pages and illustrations. It is printed in black only throughout, and it is not slipcased.
  

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Review: Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

User Review  - Apatt - Goodreads

"Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again." Oops! wrong book! I'm going to leave it there just to be contrary, besides "Call me Ishmael." just doesn't really do it for me, sorry Mr. Melville, you ... Read full review

Review: Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

User Review  - Emilian Kasemi - Goodreads

Everyone knows that Poe and Melville are the greatest pre-nineteenth-century American writers, each with their best works Gordon Pym and Moby-Dick. But not everyone knows that these novels (a strange ... Read full review

Contents

Loomings a 2 The Carpet Bag
2
The SpoutcYlnn
3
The Counterpane
27
Breakfast
31
The Street
33
j The Chapel
36
The Pulpit
39
The Sermon
42
The Pequod meets the Jeroboam Her Story 311
328
Stubb and Flask kill a Right Whale
332
The Sperm Whales Head
338
The Right Whales Head
342
The Battering Ram
346
The Qreat Heidelburgh Tun
348
Cistern and Buckets
350
The Prairie
355

A Bosom Friend
51
Nightgown
55
Biographical
57
Wheelbarrow
59
Nantucket
64
Chowder
66
The Ship
69
The Ramadan
86
His Mark
91
The Prophet
95
All Astir
99
goingAboard 1oa 12 Merry Christmas
105
The Lee Shore
110
The Advocate
111
Postscript
115
Knights and Squires
116
Knights and Squires
119
AAat
124
Enter Ahab to him Stubb
127
The Pipe
130
Queen Mab
131
32 Cetology
133
The Specksynder
148
The Cabin Table
151
The MastHead
156
The QuarterDeck Ahab and all
163
Sunset
171
Dusk
172
First NightWatch
173
ForecastleMidnight
174
Moby Dick
180
The Whiteness of the Whale
189
Hark
198
The Chart
199
The Affidavit 105
205
Surmises 114
214
The MatMaker 117
217
The First Lowering 210
220
The Hyena
231
Ahabs Boat and CrewFedallah
233
The SpiritSpout
236
50 The Pequod meets the Albatross 140
247
Monstrous Pictures of Whales
268
Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales 273
273
Of Whales in Paint in Teeth c
276
Brit
279
Squid
281
The Line 2 84
284
6a The Dart
294
The Crotch
296
Stubbs Supper
298
The Whale as a Dish
306
The Shark Massacre
309
Cutting In
310
The Blanket
314
The Funeral
317
The Sphynx
318
The Nut
358
The Pequod meets the Virgin
360
8a The Honor and Gloryof Whaling
371
Jonah Historically Regarded
374
Pitchpoling
376
The Fountain
379
The Tail
384
The Qrand Armada
389
Schools Schoolmasters
402
Fast Fish and Loose Fish
405
Heads or Tails
409
The Pequod meets the Rose Bud 412
412
Ambergris
418
The Castaway 421
421
A Squeeze of the Hand
425
The Cassock
429
The TnWorA s
431
The Lamp
436
Stowing Down Clearing Up
437
The Doubloon
440
zoo The Pequod meets the Samuel Enderby of London
446
The Decanter
453
A Bower in the Arsacides
457
Measurement of the Whales Skeleton
462
The Fossil Whale
465
Does the Whale Diminish?
468
Ahabs Leg
472
The Carpenter
475
The Deck Ahab and the Carpenter
478
The Cabin Ahab and Starbuck
481
no Queequeg in his Coffin
485
1n The Pacific
490
The Blacksmith
491
The Forge
494
The Pequod meets the Bachelor
499
The Dying Whale
502
The WhaleWatch
503
The Quadrant
505
The Candles
507
The DecA
514
Midnight on the Forecastle
515
Midnight Aloft
516
The Needle
520
The Log and Line
523
The LifeBuoy
526
Ahab and the Carpenter
530
The Pequod meets the Rachel
532
The Cabin Ahab and Pip
535
The Hot
537
The Pequod meets the Delight
541
The Symphony
543
The Chase First
547
The Chase Second Day
556
The Chase Third Day
564
EPILOGUE
577
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

Melville was born into a seemingly secure, prosperous world, a descendant of prominent Dutch and English families long established in New York State. That security vanished when first, the family business failed, and then, two years later, in young Melville's thirteenth year, his father died. Without enough money to gain the formal education that professions required, Melville was thrown on his own resources and in 1841 sailed off on a whaling ship bound for the South Seas. His experiences at sea during the next four years were to form in part the basis of his best fiction. Melville's first two books, Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847), were partly romance and partly autobiographical travel books set in the South Seas. Both were popular successes, particularly Typee, which included a stay among cannibals and a romance with a South Sea maiden. During the next several years, Melville published three more romances that drew upon his experiences at sea: Redburn (1849) and White-Jacket (1850), both fairly realistic accounts of the sailor's life and depicting the loss of innocence of central characters; and Mardi (1849), which, like the other two books, began as a romance of adventure but turned into an allegorical critique of contemporary American civilization. Moby Dick (1851) also began as an adventure story, based on Melville's experiences aboard the whaling ship. However, in the writing of it inspired in part by conversations with his friend and neighbor Hawthorne and partly by his own irrepressible imagination and reading of Shakespeare and other Renaissance dramatists Melville turned the book into something so strange that, when it appeared in print, many of his readers and critics were dumbfounded, even outraged. Their misgivings were in no way resolved by the publication in 1852 of his next novel, Pierre; or, the Ambiguities Pierre; or, the Ambiguities, a deeply personal, desperately pessimistic work that tells of the moral ruination of an innocent young man. By the mid-1850s, Melville's literary reputation was all but destroyed, and he was obliged to live the rest of his life taking whatever jobs he could find and borrowing money from relatives, who fortunately were always in a position to help him. He continued to write, however, and published some marvelous short fiction pieces Benito Cereno" (1855) and "Bartleby, the Scrivener" (1853) are the best. He also published several volumes of poetry, the most important of which was Battle Pieces and Aspects of the War (1866), poems of occasionally great power that were written in response to the moral challenge of the Civil War. His posthumously published work, Billy Budd (1924), on which he worked up until the time of his death, is Melville's last significant literary work, a brilliant short novel that movingly describes a young sailor's imprisonment and death. Melville's reputation, however, rests most solidly on his great epic romance, Moby Dick. It is a difficult as well as a brilliant book, and many critics have offered interpretations of its complicated ambiguous symbolism. Darrel Abel briefly summed up Moby Dick as "the story of an attempt to search the unsearchable ways of God," although the book has historical, political, and moral implications as well.

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