The Origins of Evil in Hindu Mythology

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1976 - Good and evil - 411 pages
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This work deals at length with various theories about relgion prevalent at the time when Megasthenes visited India very interesting and scholarly views have been put forth regarding investigations of Megasthenes their reliability and the reliability of his reporters.

  

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worst book in which author does not understand the vastness of Hinduism and its real message which 1 billion Hindus adhere to. Instead it completely demonizes entire Hinduism with few misunderstood references. If this is what Hinduism teaches than how over 1 billion Hindus are non violent, scholarly, intelligent and caring compassionate people. How this religion has produced some of the best leaders in the world. Buddha, Mahavir, vinova Bhave and Gandhi/ The logic and deep understanding of the references is lacking in this book. Wendy is a right wing Christian conspiracy, and hate monger I believe. 

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Being originally fire worshippers, Hinduism developed the grisly practice of burning a widow alive on the funeral pyre of her husband (suttee). If she did not willing jump into the fire, she was often thrown into it by the mob gathered to watch her burn to death. Child sacrifices to animal gods such as sacred crocodiles were common until this Hindu practice was criminalized by the British. The ritual murder and burial of travelers by the Kali cult (the thugees) is another example of Hinduism’s inherently demonic nature and inspiration. Other immoral practices of Hinduism included using children as sex slaves in Hindu temples. They not only served the sexual perversions of the priests and gurus but were used as prostitutes to bring in money. The poorest of the poor who often could not afford to keep a new child, left the baby in a temple assuming that the child would have a better life with the priests than with its parents. They doomed their child to a life of pain and misery.
. The tourist who travels to India’s many temples is often shocked by wall art that depicts sodomy, child sex, orgies and bestiality of the grossest kind. Yet, all this is part of what lies at the core of Hinduism. The same shock is received when tourists see Hindus drinking urine from animals and humans and smearing dung in their hair and on their body. The smell that emanates from the gurus, monks and holy men of Hinduism is enough to warn us that Hinduism is rotten to the core. Why are we beginning our discussion of Hinduism with such ugly topics as racism, the caste system, burning of widows, ritual child abuse and gross immorality? To see the true nature of Hinduism we must study what it produces in those societies where it is the dominant religion. Thus a mere abstract philosophic presentation of Hinduism in the classroom will give a false view of it. Hinduism is far more than a list of abstract dogmas. It is actually a social program that seeks to organize a culture according to Hindu concepts of soul-transmigration, karma, race and caste.
. The Philosophic Failures of Hinduism 1. Hinduism denies the existence of the infinite/personal triune God of the Bible who exists independent of and apart from the universe which He created out of nothing. It is atheistic in this sense. 2. Hinduism never solved the problem of the One and Many or the infinite/personal dichotomy. 3. Those Hindus who emphasize the One over the Many, teach Monism (All is One) and pantheism (All is God), erasing any distinction between Creator and creation. “God” is an impersonal infinite force or power which manifest itself as the universe around us. The “things” we see around us do not really exist per se. They are only illusions of the One. This is what the high caste Hindus teach the Westerners who come to India in search of “enlightenment.”
 

Contents

TIME FATE AND THE FALL OF MAN
14
THE NECESSITY OF EVIL
46
GODS DEMONS AND MEN
57
THE BIRTH OF DEATH
212
CROWDS IN HEAVEN
248
GOD IS A HERETIC
272
3 The problem of imitation 286 4 Gautama and the Seven
310
GOOD AND EVIL WITHIN MAN
321
gration
360
THE MANY PATHS OF THEODICY
370
The one and the many 370 2 The varieties of Hindu experience
376
INDEX
397
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