Re-understanding Japan: Chinese Perespectives, 1895-1945 (Google eBook)

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University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 339 pages
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To many Chinese, the rise and expansion of Japanese power during the years between the two Sino-Japanese wars (1895-1945) presented a paradox: With its successful modernization, Japan became a model to be emulated; yet as the country's imperial ambitions on the continent grew, it posed an ever-increasing threat. Drawing on an extraordinary array of source materials, Lu Yan shows that this attraction to and apprehension of Japan prompted the Chinese to engage in a variety of long-term relationships with the Japanese. Re-understanding Japan examines transnational and transcultural interactions between China and Japan during those five dramatic and tragic decades at the intimate level of personal lives and behavior. At the center of Lu's study are four diverse yet significant case studies: military strategist Jiang Baili, literary critic and essayist Zhou Zuoren, Guomindang leader Dai Jitao, and romantic poet turned Communist Guo Moruo. In their public and private lives, these influential Chinese formed lasting ties with Japan and the Japanese. While their writings reached the Chinese public through the print mass media and served to enhance popular understanding of Japan and its cult
  

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Contents

Riding the Crest of Chinese Nationalism
19
Beyond Chinese Nationalism
39
A Case of Ambivalence
67
A Case of Frustration
90
ProJapanese or AntiJapanese?
119
The End of a PanAsian Vision
144
For Survival
173
For Rejuvenation
194
With Sorrow
220
CONCLUSION
247
ABBREVIATIONS
260
CHARACTER LIST
307
INDEX
333
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