Women, Gender, and Human Rights: A Global Perspective

Front Cover
Marjorie Agosín
Rutgers University Press, 2001 - Political Science - 339 pages
2 Reviews
"This anthology adds strength and credence to the struggle for women's human rights. It reinforces the conviction that no society can prosper and no new world be born until the rights of women are fully protected and realized."-William F. Schulz, executive director of Amnesty International, USA "The devastating commonalities and startling differences in women's oppression and activism around the world are keenly explored in this excellent anthology. Agosin's collection provokes a powerful reexamination of the human rights field."-Jacqueline Bhabha, Harvard University "This moving anthology, masterfully compiled by poet and human rights activist Marjorie Agosin, is a must for scholars, students, and human rights workers; it also will captivate the general reader."-Elena O. Nightingale, scholar-in-residence, National Academy of Sciences "Essential reading, Women, Gender, and Human Rights argues forcefully and convincingly that the elimination of gender-based violence and discrimination, so often ignored by governments and aid organizations, must be at the center of the struggle for social justice and human dignity in this new century."-Eric Stover, author of The Graves: Srebrenica and Vukovar The 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights expresses the credo that all human beings are created free and equal. But not until 1995 did the United Nations declare women's rights to be human rights, and bring gender issues into the global arena for the first time. Women, Gender, and Human Rights is the first collection of essays encompassing a wide range of women's issues, including political and domestic violence, education, literacy, and reproductive rights. Most of the essays were written expressly for this volume by internationally known experts in the fields of government, bioethics, medicine, public affairs, literature, history, anthropology, law, and psychology. Recipient of the Henrietta Szold Award by Hadassah (2001), the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor (2000), and the United Nations Leadership Award (1999), Marjorie Agosin is a professor of Spanish at Wellesley College. Among her books are A Map of Hope: Writings on Women and Human Rights and The Alphabet in My Hands (both by Rutgers University Press).
  

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Contents

Introduction
11
Womens Human Rights in the Public
65
Women Violence and the Human Rights System
83
Mainstreaming a Concern for the Human
98
WOMEN AND HEALTH
123
The Rights of the Girl Child JULIA CHILL
152
Psychocultural Factors in the Adaptation of Jmmigrant
170
AND SOCIAL CHANGE
189
Degrees of Separation JANE STAPLETON
219
Gender Apartheid Cultural Relativism
234
Meeting the Challenge of the LocalGlobal Link
246
IViWOMEN AND THE CULTURES
265
Epistolary Literature JOSEPH SLAUGHTER
289
Before the Mirror CHRISTOPHER MERRILL
312
About the Contributors
323
About the Editor
340

The Forgotten Minority JEAN TROUNSTINE
205

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References to this book

Global Feminism
Aili Tripp
Limited preview - 2006
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About the author (2001)

Marjorie Agosin was born in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1955. She has written many books of poetry and fiction. Her childhood and early adolescence were spent with her Jewish family in Chile, where her family also participated in the dominant Catholic culture. The young Agosin became keenly aware of her dual identity in her country, both as a participant and as an outsider. The overthrow of Salvador Allende forced her family to immigrate to Athens, Georgia, where she was then ostracized as an emigrant. She is a professor of Spanish at Wellesley College. The poet's current residence is in New England.

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