Hanover and Prussia 1795-1803: a study in neutrality, Issue 48 (Google eBook)

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Columbia University Press, 1903 - History - 316 pages
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Page 148 - Prussia, supported by Hanover, is doing everything that is possible to distress us in the Empire. Its views evidently are to set on foot an army at the expense of the Circles of Westphalia and Lower Saxony in order to avail itself of events. . . . The conduct of Hanover gives great discontent here (Vienna) and it seems impossible for me to convince any one that His Majesty's English ministers have no influence over the counsels of his Hanoverian government." Cf. Journal . . . of Lord Auckland, iii,...
Page 262 - ... as a member and her general disinclination to serve Russia's and France's plans on Malta. The whole Napoleonic hope, of making commerce manoeuvre like a regiment in 1801, and later in the Continental system, is nowhere more keenly criticized than in the despatch of Lord Minto from Vienna, March I, 1801 (English Record Office), commenting on the Maritime League: " . . . . the attempt to seclude one of the greatest and most extensive Empires on the Globe, I mean that of His Majesty from the fellowship...
Page 215 - Prusse, autant le respect pour des engagements, qui eux-mêmes en sont la preuve, dirigeront à l'avenir les démarches du roi. Il doit à des stipulations , qui n'eurent rien d'hostile , que la sûreté de ses sujets lui dicta, tous les moyens que la Providence a mis en son pouvoir.
Page 300 - ... time, is given by Ulmann, p. 65, note 2. To the evidence given there I would add that of Mr. Jackson. Cf. his important despatch of July 16, 1803, in the English Record Office. Such a letter was not found by Dr. Bailleu while editing the correspondence between the two rulers. Cf. Publicationen out den kgl.
Page 34 - ... the nation should not be obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories not belonging to the crown of England ; that no person who...
Page 35 - ... without the consent of parliament. He was not to go out of the dominions of England, Scotland, and Ireland without the consent of parliament. This guarding against foreign interests was pushed even farther by the provision that no person born out of these kingdoms and not of English parents should be capable of sitting in parliament, or in the privy council, or of holding any civil or military office or of receiving any grant of land from...
Page 61 - II's wish. Cf. Sorel in the Rev. Hist., v, 284, and Ranke, Hardenberg, i, 223. Bailleu in the Hist. Zeit., 1895, p. 245 et seq. One is reminded of von Berenhorst's remark made ten years later: " Preussen ist nicht ein Land, das eine Armee hat, sondern eine Armee, die ein Land hat." Quoted by Havemann, Gesch. Hannover, p. 38. Paris, was sent to Basel. His instructions, dated Dec. 7, 1794, had been prepared from a draft made by the uncle of the king, Prince Henry.1 They directed Count Goltz to secure...
Page 84 - Ward, Great Britain and Hanover, p. 10. "Which of these (members of the Quadruple Alliance) could compare with the devotion of the House of Brunswick-Lueneburg to the House of Austria? This sentiment was as an article of faith with the Hanoverian advisers of Geo. I." One could hardly say as much for the sentiments of the Hanoverian ministry of George III. "Von Sichart, Gesch. d. hannov. Armee, pt. iv, pp. 22-30. 'Havemann, Geschichte von Braunschweig und Hannover, vol. iii, pt. iv. this giving of...
Page 57 - Ranke,' to have emphasized in contradistinction to Schlosser, Sybel, Hiiffer and Hausser, the view that the participation of Prussia in the war of the First Coalition against France did not correspond to the interests of the national Prussian policy, and that the treaty of Basel indicates a return to that policy. Consequently in becoming reconciled, Prussia and France obeyed their old traditions. Prussia, viewing things as they were at the time of the treaty of Basel, was justified in thinking the...
Page 175 - The chapter on the Prussian occupation of Hanover in 1801, indicates how Russian interference put a bar to the development of a Prussian hegemony. Dr. Bailleu suggests Polish interests, which from the time of the treaty of Basel had diverted Prussian energies from the German field.