The Story of Baha'u'llah: Promised One of All Religions

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Baha'i Publishing Trust, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 359 pages
3 Reviews
An easy-to-read introduction to the Prophet and Founder of the Baha'i Faith.Born to Persian nobility in the early nineteenth century, Baha'u'llah (1817-1892) seemed destined for a life of wealth and ease. Yet from an early age He showed little interest in courtly privileges, preferring to minister to the less fortunate of His native Tehran. Later, He cast aside all considerations of future material comfort by declaring His recognition of the Bab. The Bab was a young man from Shiraz who claimed to be a Messenger sent by God to transform the spiritual life of humanity and to prepare the way for One who would bring an even greater revelation. His support of the Bab resulted in the loss of virtually all His worldly possessions, imprisonment in Tehran's notorious Black Pit, and a series of increasingly harsh and remote exiles spanning forty years. The first exile was to Baghdad, where, in 1863, Baha'u'llah announced that He was that Promised One foretold by the Bab and, in fact, by all the world's religions.From Baghdad, Baha'u'llah was sent to Constantinople, then Adrianople, and finally to 'Akka, a remote outpost of the Ottoman Empire. Each exile was intended to strip Baha'u'llah of His influence and exterminate the young religion, yet each move had the opposite effect. Baha'u'llah teachings about the underlying unity of the world's religions and the inevitable emergence of a unified global civilization attracted thousands to investigate further. Today, the Baha'i Faith is the second most widespread of the world's religions, with a growing membership numbering some five million.
  

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The Story of Baha'u'llah, Promised One of All Religions

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Who was Bah'u'llh (1817-92)? Why was he persecuted, tortured, imprisoned, and exiled by the political and religious authorities of his time? These volumes attempt to make the life of this self ... Read full review

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A while ago, a very kind lady asked me (with all deference), "Isn't the Baha'i Faith a cult?" The answer to that question is a definitive "No." I recommend "The Story of Baha'u' llah," to anyone curious about the origins of the Baha'i Faith, now well established in most of the world.
In my lifetime, the Baha'i Faith has been raised from obscurity by its own members. Considering its modernity (originating just 165 years ago) and its lack of clergy, liturgy, dogma or doctrine, the Baha'i Faith is well worth the consideration of comparative religion students and especially by lovers of Mystery. The Faith described in this book is the first worldwide religion to emerge within the full gaze of "history."
"The Story of Baha'u'llah" is not academic study; plenty of other Baha'i books are available for scholarly purposes. "The Story . . ." describes what all divine experience shares . . . an epic story begun in obscurity that nevertheless, reaches the masses through archetypal event, binding the mundane to the Divine through organic movement.
I salute Druzelle Cedarquist's ability to convey a large amount of detail from Baha'i historical sources (who are themselves, rewarding to read, but sometimes challenging due to 19th century literary conventions). This book is written in straightforward language, and conveys the story of Him Whom Baha'i Writings refer to as "The Ancient Beauty," and "He Whom God Shall Make Manifest."
Make no mistake, "The Story of Baha'u'llah" explains the origins of the Baha'i Faith in its amazingly heroic terms, recounting the blazing sacrifices of early believers in Iran, including the Family of Baha'u'llah. The result of "The Story" is the remarkably swift establishment of a new, open, fresh-faced religion of universal breadth.
 

Contents

Shaykh Mahmúds Secret Plan
3
The Puppet Show and the Dream
6
The Home of Love
10
Father of the Poor and Mother of Consolation
13
No Time to Lose
17
The Quest
23
Witnesses of the Dawn
27
Noble Descendant of a Noble Father
32
One Hundred and Ten Days
172
The Sultans Command
175
The Poisoned Cup
178
The Most Great Separation
182
He Who Feareth No One
186
O Kings of the Earth
190
Destination Unknown
194
The Most Great Prison
198

The Mujtahid and the Dervish
36
Awake Awake
40
The Scholar and the Governors
44
The Open Mountain and the Grievous Mountain
50
Rage and a Secret Rescue
53
The Blast of the Trumpet
57
The Sermon of Wrath and a Royal Command
62
BandarGaz and the Black Standard
64
Danger at Amul
68
Courage at Tabarsí
72
Embattled
76
No Peace in the City of Tabríz
80
A Promise Kept in Karbala
86
A Plot against the Shah
90
Prisoner
94
The Black Pit
96
Cruel Days
100
The Mystery of God and His Treasure
105
Banished
110
Terrible Journey
114
Baghdad
121
Thousands of Oceans of Light
124
The Dark Campaign
128
Alone in the Wilderness
131
The Nameless One
135
A Joyful NawRúz
140
Purity within Purity
144
Unlocking the Doors of Heaven
148
The Shaykh and the Assassin
153
The Eldest Uncles Questions
157
A Paradox Resolved
163
The Garden of Paradise
167
Seeking a Glimpse of the Lord
201
For the Healing of All the World
204
Into the Mouth of the Serpent
209
The Greatest Gift
213
The Whisperings of Satan
218
The Keys of My Mercy
222
The Governor and the Master of Acre
226
Two Birds of the Nest of Thy Love
229
The Hand of God
234
Oasis
238
The King of Martyrs and the Beloved of Martyrs
242
Blessed Is the Place
246
To Conquer the Cities of the Hearts
250
The Master
254
O Most Exalted Leaf
258
These Fruitless Strifes These Ruinous Wars
263
The King of Days
267
The Holy Mountain and the Martyrs of Yazd
273
A Pattern for the Future
278
The Sun of Bahá Has Set
284
An Excellent and Priceless Heritage
287
A Brief Chronology of Events in the Life of Baháullah
291
A Note about the Wives of Baháullah and Bahái Marriage
293
Islam and Its Two Major Branches Shia and Sunni
294
Millennial Christians
296
Mírzá Yahyá
300
Notes
303
Glossary
319
Bibliography
335
Index
341
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About the author (2005)

DRUZELLE CEDERQUIST is a poet, writer, and family literacy advocate as well as a wife, mother of two children, and member of the Baháí Faith. She and her husband, Rob, live in New York.

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