Church Building: A Study of the Principles of Architecture in Their Relation to the Church (Google eBook)

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Small, Maynard, 1901 - Church architecture - 227 pages
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Page 10 - While he thus insisted that the primary function of a church remained that its inhabitants "be filled with the righteous sense of awe and mystery and devotion," he also recognized that an ideal church must be a place "where a congregation may conveniently listen to the instruction of its spiritual leaders."31 Cram's medieval aesthetic conflicted with modern acoustical necessities.
Page 43 - ... Episcopal cathedral in Albany, New York, having marked the new beginning during the previous decade. Gothic, though used occasionally, had vigorous competitors in the Richardsonian Romanesque and in other styles. There was none of this uncertainty in Cram's mind. In words reminiscent of Pugin, he declared: "There is one style, and only one, that we have a right to; and that is Gothic as it was when all art was destroyed at the time of the Reformation.
Page 223 - Pravda were drawn up, we pass to the end of the fourteenth and the beginning of the fifteenth centuries...
Page 6 - What, then, are the qualities of a church, and their order of precedence? It seems to me that they are four, and that they stand in the following order of importance : First of all, a church is a house of God, a place of His earthly habitation, wrought in the fashion of heavenly things, a visible type of heaven itself.
Page 8 - Cram put it, an important aspect of church architecture is: the creation of spiritual emotion through the ministry of all possible beauty of environment; the using of art to lift men's minds from secular things to spiritual, that their souls may be brought into harmony with God. . . . Not in the barren and ugly meeting-house of the Puritans . . . were men most easily lifted out of themselves into spiritual communion with God . . . but where they were surrounded by the dim shadows of mysterious aisles...
Page 8 - ... softened high overhead into sweeping arches and shadowy vaults, where golden light struck down through storied windows, painted with the benignant faces of saints and angels; where the eye rested at every turn on a painted and carven Bible, manifesting itself through the senses to the imagination; where every wall, every foot of floor, bore its silent memorial to the dead, its thank-offering to God; where was always the faint odor of old incense, the still atmosphere of prayer and...
Page 8 - Christianity and the exalting solemnity of divine worship, but where they were surrounded by the dim shadows of mysterious aisles, where lofty piers of stone softened high overhead into sweeping arches and shadowy vaults, where golden light struck down through storied windows, painted with the benignant faces of saints and angels ; where the eye rested at every turn on a painted and carven Bible, manifesting itself through the senses to the...
Page 7 - This is the first and highest reason for church building, and the second is this : the providing of a place apart where may be solemnized the sublime mysteries of the Catholic faith ; a temple reared about the altar, and subordinate to it, leading up to it, as to the centre of honor, growing richer and more splendid as it approaches the sanctuary...
Page 11 - Church building: a study of the principles of architecture in their relation to the church.
Page 69 - CATHEDRALS 7;/ the city church (ecclesiastical architecture} obtains its fullest chance of showing its adaptability to conditions essentially modern and almost without precedent. It is here that Christian architecture is privileged to prove its extreme adaptability, its vitality, its power of fitting itself to new conditions without losing any of its historic and spiritual qualities. Ralph Adams Cram IT WOULD be nice to claim that Henry Vaughan, the master of the country church, redirected the city...

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