Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, 1893 - Avarice - 218 pages
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gucchi - LibraryThing

This book has two stories. I like first srtory “RIP VAN WINKLE”. One day Rip meets a strange man in the mountain. After that he went to building with him and slept there..... I think this story likes ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - abc888 - LibraryThing

This story have two stories. I like first story than second. The first story is “RIP VAN WINKLE”. This story looks like Japanese “Urasimataro” and is interesting. I enjoyed reading this book. Why don't you read? Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
15
III
105

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Page 83 - The name of the child, the air of the mother, the tone of her voice, all awakened a train of recollections in his mind. "What is your name, my good woman?
Page 82 - Rip looked, and beheld a precise counterpart of himself, as he went up the mountain: apparently as lazy, and certainly as ragged. The poor fellow was now completely confounded. He doubted his own identity, and whether he was himself or another man. In the midst of his bewilderment, the man in the cocked hat demanded who he was, and What, was his name?
Page 49 - Winkle !" He looked round, but could see nothing but a crow winging its solitary flight across the mountain. He thought his fancy must have deceived : him, and turned again to descend, when he heard the same cry ring through the still evening air ; " Rip Van Winkle ! Rip Van Winkle...
Page 58 - ... were evidently amusing themselves, yet they maintained the gravest faces, the most mysterious silence, and were, withal, the most melancholy party of pleasure he had ever witnessed. Nothing interrupted the stillness of the scene but the noise of the balls, which, whenever they were rolled, echoed along the mountains like rumbling peals of thunder. As Rip and his companion approached them, they suddenly desisted from their play, and stared at him with such fixed, statue-like gaze, and such strange,...
Page 108 - The dominant spirit, however, that haunts this enchanted region, and seems to be commander-in-chief of all the powers of the air, is the apparition of a figure on horseback without a head. It is said by some to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper, whose head had been carried away by a cannon-ball, in some nameless battle during the revolutionary war...
Page 38 - How solemnly they would listen to the contents, as drawled out by Derrick Van Bummel, the schoolmaster, a dapper learned little man, who was not to be daunted by the most gigantic word in the dictionary ; and how sagely they would deliberate upon public events some months after they had taken place. The opinions of this junto were completely controlled by Nicholas Vedder, a patriarch of the village, and landlord of the inn...
Page 33 - Winkle, however, was one of those happy mortals, of foolish, well-oiled dispositions, who take the world easy, eat white bread or brown, whichever can be got with least thought or trouble, and would rather starve on a penny than work for a pound.
Page 29 - He would carry a fowling-piece on his shoulder for hours together, trudging through woods and swamps, and up hill and down dale, to shoot a few squirrels or wild pigeons.
Page 42 - ... of his wife, was to take gun in hand and stroll away into the woods. Here he would sometimes seat himself at the foot of a tree, and share the contents of his wallet with Wolf, with whom he sympathized as a fellow-sufferer in persecution. "Poor Wolf...
Page 21 - In that same village, and in one of these very houses (which, to tell the precise truth, was sadly time-worn and weather-beaten), there lived many years since, while the country was yet a province of Great Britain, a simple, good-natured fellow, of the name of Rip Van Winkle. He was a descendant of the Van Winkles who figured so gallantly in the chivalrous days of Peter Stuyvesant...

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