Clinical lectures on paralysis, certain diseases of the brain, and other affections of the nervous system (Google eBook)

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Churchill, 1856 - 474 pages
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Page 217 - To this question after having given a fair trial to the various means which have been proposed...
Page 246 - ... there takes place an attempt at cicatrization, more or less perfect. Attendant on this, there is a gradual shrinking or contraction of the cerebral matter, which, acting on the...
Page 302 - It leaves behind it a more or less exhausted state of brain; which, again, will be most upon that side upon which there has been the greatest previous excitement. This state of exhaustion is very apt to continue as one of weakened nutrition, in which the brain tissue is more or less in the condition of white softening. If the parts involved in this be the convolutions, mental power, memory, perception, suffer; if deeper parts, as the deeper parts of the white matter of the hemispheres, with the corpora...
Page 121 - ... sufficiently strong heart, you may bleed him with every chance of success; but if he has been of intemperate habits, is labouring under organic disease of the heart and arteries, is of gouty or rheumatic constitution, then, whatever popular or medical custom may say, my advice to you is, hesitate much before you deplete by bleeding.
Page 218 - ... apt to do mischief, and never does good. I have seen cases in which, after the employment of electricity for some time, that agent has apparently brought on pain in the head, and has excited something like an inflammatory process in the brain. And so strychnia will also induce an analogous condition of the brain, and will increase the rigidity of the paralyzed muscles. Some good may occasionally be effected by the use of friction or cold water, or shampooing, all of which tend to improve the...
Page 435 - ... the valves, and must necessarily be present so long as that imperfection exists. Another point in the history of this boy, to which I have not yet referred, is, that there is a tendency in his family to rheumatic complaints ; for we find from the history, that his elder brother, aged 14, also had an attack of rheumatic fever about a year ago. A day or two before the symptoms appeared, this boy was much frightened by his sister, who had covered herself with a white sheet, and appeared before him...
Page 120 - ... of it, and would readily condemn a practitioner as guilty of the death of his patient, who suffered him to die unbled. It is a far more dashing and courageous thing to open a vein on the spot, and in the presence of a number of anxious friends, than to adopt less showy, and apparently less active measures. But, indeed, you need not be inactive, even if you decide against adopting the plan of bleeding. Having placed your patient in an easy position, in which no excitement of muscular action is...
Page 463 - This treatment was attended with the happiest result; the pain left the right side, but, as if in illustration of its true nature, she now complains of a pain in the left or blistered side, less severe, however, than the original pain. But from the great improvement in her general health, and the abatement which has already taken place in her symptoms, there can be no doubt that time is now the most important element in her cure.
Page 443 - ... state of any part of the great nervous centres or of other organs. Indeed, it is impossible to fix upon any particular organ of the body in which anything like structural lesion exists as a constant feature in cases of chorea. The disease is one of functional disturbance rather than of organic change, and this is borne out by the results of post-mortem examinations ; for almost without exception we fail to detect in those cases of chorea which terminate fatally any morbid alteration...
Page 448 - ... means to exercise the paralysed muscles, otherwise they would suffer in nutrition, and a permanently weakened state of the muscles would result. For this purpose, nothing is better than the careful use of galvanism. A gentle and...

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