The Failure of Grassroots Pan-Africanism: The Case of the All-African Trade Union Federation

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Lexington Books, Jan 1, 2003 - History - 371 pages
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A work of masterful scholarship and powerful feeling, The Failure of Grassroots Pan-Africanism traces the political history of a Pan-Africanist inspired non-aligned trade union federation, the All-African Trade Union Federation (AATUF). Set up in 1961, this federation's mission was to provide organizational impetus to the cause of the political unification of Africa's multitude of artificial, nonviable states. This thoroughly researched analysis establishes the multiple causes of the AATUF's tragic failure, and author Opoku Agyeman examines key players such as the sponsoring "radical-nationist" African political leaderships, the World Federation of Trade Unions, the American AFL-CIO and the CIA. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, few scholarly tasks are as urgent as exploring the creative options that exist for Africa's regeneration. Agyeman furthers this task in his examination of the appropriate modalities for forging collaboration between African states. No other book on Africa combines such strong scholarship with an uncompromising Pan-Africanist outlook
  

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Contents

XII
47
XIII
51
XIV
61
XV
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XVI
77
XVII
78
XVIII
80
XIX
81
XLIV
219
XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXXI
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LXXIV
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LXXV
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LXXVI
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LXXVII
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LXXVIII
371
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Page 5 - The essence of neo-colonialism is that the State which is subject to it is, in theory,, independent and has all the outward trappings of international sovereignty. In reality its economic system and thus its political policy is directed from outside.
Page 9 - Africa from the hands of alien exploiters and found there a government, a nation of our own, strong enough to lend protection to the members of our race scattered all over the world, and to compel the respect of the nations and races of the earth.
Page 30 - I believe that the Socialist countries themselves, considered as 'individuals' in the larger society of nations, are now committing the same crime as was committed by the Capitalists before. On the international level, they are now beginning to use Wealth for capitalist purposes that is, for the acquisition of power and prestige.
Page 6 - How can we depend upon gifts, loans and investments from foreign countries and foreign companies without endangering our independence? The English people have a proverb which says: "He who pays the piper calls the tune." How can we depend upon foreign governments and companies for the major part of our development without giving to those governments and countries a great part of our freedom to act as we please? The truth is that we cannot.
Page 9 - Wake up Ethiopia! Wake up Africa! Let us work towards the one glorious end of a free, redeemed and mighty nation. Let Africa be a bright star among the constellation of nations.
Page 43 - Now I am sending $35 for seven more shares. You might think I have money, but the truth, as I stated before, is that I have no money now. But if I'm to die of hunger it will be all right because I'm determined to do all that's in my power to better the conditions of my race.
Page 10 - America and the world will be informed that the best in the Negro race is not the class of beggars who send out to other races piteous appeals annually for donations to maintain their coterie, but the groups within us that are honestly striving to do for themselves...

About the author (2003)

Opoku Agyeman is professor of political science at Montclair State University. He has published extensively on African politics and Pan-Africanism.

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