The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 3, 2011 - Philosophy
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The Cratylus, one of Plato's most difficult and intriguing dialogues, explores the relations between a name and the thing it names. The questions that arise lead the characters to face a number of major issues: truth and falsehood, relativism, etymology, the possibility of a perfect language, the relation between the investigation of names and that of reality, the Heraclitean flux theory and the Theory of Forms. This full-scale commentary on the Cratylus offers a definitive interpretation of the dialogue. It contains translations of the passages discussed and a line-by-line analysis which deals with textual matters and unravels Plato's dense and subtle arguments, reaching a novel interpretation of some of the dialogue's main themes as well as of many individual passages. The book is intended primarily for graduate students and scholars, both philosophers and classicists, but presupposes no previous acquaintance with the subject and is accessible to undergraduates.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
chapter 1 Cratylus naturalism 383a384c
23
chapter 2 Hermogenes conventionalism 384c386e
37
chapter 3 Naturalism defended 386e390e
95
chapter 4 Naturalism unfolded 390e394e
146
chapter 5 Naturalism illustrated the etymologies of secondary names 394e421c
181
chapter 6 Naturalism illustrated the primary names 421c427e
257
chapter 7 Naturalism discussed 427e433b
317
chapter 9 Flux and forms 439b440e
449
Appendix1 The text of 437d10438b8
489
Appendix 2 Some interpolations and nonmechanical errors in W and d
496
References
497
General index
509
Index of ancient texts
517
Index of Greek expressions
533
Index of words discussed in the Cratylus
536

chapter 8 Naturalism refuted and conventionalism defended 433b439b
383

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About the author (2011)

Francesco Ademollo studied classics at the University of Florence and has held postdoctoral research positions at the University of Florence and at the Scuola Normale Superiore. He currently teaches Greek and Latin at the Liceo Classico Galileo in Florence.

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