Handbook of Data Analysis

Front Cover
Melissa A Hardy, Alan Bryman
SAGE Publications, Jun 17, 2009 - Reference - 728 pages
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'This book provides an excellent reference guide to basic theoretical arguments, practical quantitative techniques and the methodologies that the majority of social science researchers are likely to require for postgraduate study and beyond' - Environment and Planning

 

'The book provides researchers with guidance in, and examples of, both quantitative and qualitative modes of analysis, written by leading practitioners in the field. The editors give a persuasive account of the commonalities of purpose that exist across both modes, as well as demonstrating a keen awareness of the different things that each offers the practising researcher' - Clive Seale, Brunel University

 

'With the appearance of this handbook, data analysts no longer have to consult dozens of disparate publications to carry out their work. The essential tools for an intelligent telling of the data story are offered here, in thirty chapters written by recognized experts. ' - Michael Lewis-Beck, F Wendell Miller Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Iowa

 

'This is an excellent guide to current issues in the analysis of social science data. I recommend it to anyone who is looking for authoritative introductions to the state of the art. Each chapter offers a comprehensive review and an extensive bibliography and will be invaluable to researchers wanting to update themselves about modern developments' - Professor Nigel Gilbert, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Sociology, University of Surrey

 

This is a book that will rapidly be recognized as the bible for social researchers. It provides a first-class, reliable guide to the basic issues in data analysis, such as the construction of variables, the characterization of distributions and the notions of inference. Scholars and students can turn to it for teaching and applied needs with confidence.

 

The book also seeks to enhance debate in the field by tackling more advanced topics such as models of change, causality, panel models and network analysis. Specialists will find much food for thought in these chapters.

 

A distinctive feature of the book is the breadth of coverage. No other book provides a better one-stop survey of the field of data analysis. In 30 specially commissioned chapters the editors aim to encourage readers to develop an appreciation of the range of analytic options available, so they can choose a research problem and then develop a suitable approach to data analysis.

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Very good book and its initial part is very useful.

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About the author (2009)

RESEARCH aND TEACHING INTERESTS Quantitative Analysis Techniques, Longitudinal Methods; Aging & Social Change; Public Policy and Aging. Social Inequality, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. “Workforce aging in the new economy: A comparative study of information technology employment” (Julie A. McMullin, PI; Victor Marshall, Joann Marshall, University of North Carolina; Neil Charness, Florida State University). October 2002 – September 2006. Work and Retirement, including the influence of organizational incentives, pensions, family decision-making, health, job satisfaction; Public Policy, including Social Security, the Age Discrimination and Employment Act, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, Medicare and Medicaid; Political Attitudes, including analysis of social change and individual aging; Women’s Issues and Aging, including poverty and financial security, caregiving, long-term care, intergenerational assistance, and health; Cognitive Components of Saving and Investment behavior, including planning horizon, discounting, risk tolerance, deferred gratification; Older Workers, including training, displacement, work schedules, job demands, organizational incentive structures.

Alan Bryman is Professor of Organizational and Social Research, School of Management, University of Leicester, UK.

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