I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

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University of California Press, 1995 - History - 525 pages
27 Reviews
This momentous work offers a groundbreaking history of the early civil rights movement in the South. Using wide-ranging archival work and extensive interviews with movement participants, Charles Payne uncovers a chapter of American social history forged locally, in places like Greenwood, Mississippi, where countless unsung African Americans risked their lives for the freedom struggle. The leaders were ordinary women and men--sharecroppers, domestics, high school students, beauticians, independent farmers--committed to organizing the civil rights struggle house by house, block by block, relationship by relationship. Payne brilliantly brings to life the tradition of grassroots African American activism, long practiced yet poorly understood.
Payne overturns familiar ideas about community activism in the 1960s. The young organizers who were the engines of change in the state were not following any charismatic national leader. Far from being a complete break with the past, their work was based directly on the work of an older generation of activists, people like Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Amzie Moore, Medgar Evers, Aaron Henry. These leaders set the standards of courage against which young organizers judged themselves; they served as models of activism that balanced humanism with militance. While historians have commonly portrayed the movement leadership as male, ministerial, and well-educated, Payne finds that organizers in Mississippi and elsewhere in the most dangerous parts of the South looked for leadership to working-class rural Blacks, and especially to women. Payne also finds that Black churches, typically portrayed as frontrunners in the civil rights struggle, were in fact late supporters of the movement. This momentous work offers a groundbreaking history of the early civil rights movement in the South. Using wide-ranging archival work and extensive interviews with movement participants, Charles Payne uncovers a chapter of American social history forged locally, in places like Greenwood, Mississippi, where countless unsung African Americans risked their lives for the freedom struggle. The leaders were ordinary women and men--sharecroppers, domestics, high school students, beauticians, independent farmers--committed to organizing the civil rights struggle house by house, block by block, relationship by relationship. Payne brilliantly brings to life the tradition of grassroots African American activism, long practiced yet poorly understood.
Payne overturns familiar ideas about community activism in the 1960s. The young organizers who were the engines of change in the state were not following any charismatic national leader. Far from being a complete break with the past, their work was based directly on the work of an older generation of activists, people like Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Amzie Moore, Medgar Evers, Aaron Henry. These leaders set the standards of courage against which young organizers judged themselves; they served as models of activism that balanced humanism with militance. While historians have commonly portrayed the movement leadership as male, ministerial, and well-educated, Payne finds that organizers in Mississippi and elsewhere in the most dangerous parts of the South looked for leadership to working-class rural Blacks, and especially to women. Payne also finds that Black churches, typically portrayed as frontrunners in the civil rights struggle, were in fact late supporters of the movement.
  

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Review: I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

User Review  - Thomas Flowers - Goodreads

one of the best, most detailed books regarding the civil rights movement as told from activists young and old who've we never even heard of. Payne focuses on Mississippi, mostly in the rural delta ... Read full review

Review: I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

User Review  - Deb - Goodreads

This is a wonderful book, filled with moving oral histories and stories from a wide range of African American civil rights activists in Mississippi. Payne interweaves these primary sources with a most ... Read full review

Contents

GIVE LIGHT AND THE PEOPLE WILL FIND A
67
MOVING ON MISSISSIPPI
103
FIVE
132
IF YOU DONT GO DONT HINDER
180
SEVEN
207
EIGHT
236
NINE
265
ELEVEN
312
FROM SNCC TO SLICK
338
THIRTEEN
363
FOURTEEN
391
EPILOGUE
407
INDEX
493
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Charles M. Payne is Professor and Bass Fellow, African American Studies, History and Sociology, Duke University

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