Criminal Law

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Cengage Learning, Jan 21, 2010 - Social Science - 528 pages
2 Reviews
Providing the undergraduate criminal law course with a nationally acclaimed blend of analysis and illustrative cases, Joel Samaha's CRIMINAL LAW, 10e is the textbook of choice among instructors nationwide. Praised for his clear, concise, engaging writing style, Samaha presents criminal law using a combined text/casebook approach. Though cases are included to amplify text coverage, this bestseller is comprehensive enough to stand alone--giving instructors the flexibility to choose the amount of case coverage they want, while knowing they have the best of the best in terms of case law. A number of fully explicated cases and some case excerpts cover the broad range of criminal law, giving instructors additional flexibility to select the degree to which case excerpts and explanations are used. The full text of all excepted cases in the book is available on the website. Packed with the latest topics and cases--and accompanied by a powerful collection of teaching and learning resources--the new Tenth Edition is even more effective in helping students understand and think analytically about the underlying principles and policies that specific cases illustrate.
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Review: Criminal Law

User Review  - Bonnie - Goodreads

This was for a class and it is a good read. Interesting cases and easy to understand. Read full review

Review: Criminal Law

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

Not too dry! Read full review

About the author (2010)

Joel Samaha is Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, The Supreme Court and the Constitution, and a special joint Sociology/History Department course entitled Is There a Wartime Exception to the Bill of Rights? He received his B.A., J.D., and Ph.D. from Northwestern University and studied under the late Sir Geoffrey Elton at Cambridge University, England. Professor Samaha was admitted to the Illinois Bar, briefly practiced law in Chicago, and then taught at UCLA. In 1971, he joined the University of Minnesota, where he served as Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice Studies for four years, taught television and radio courses in criminal justice, co-taught a National Endowment for the Humanities seminar in legal and constitutional history, and was named Distinguished Teacher in 1974. Professor Samaha's works have appeared in Historical Journal, American Journal of Legal History, Minnesota Law Review, William Mitchell Law Review, and Journal of Social History.

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