The Underpants: A Play by Carl Sternheim

Front Cover
Steve Martin
Hyperion, Nov 20, 2002 - Drama - 152 pages
33 Reviews
Theobald Maske has an unusual problem: his wife's underpants won't stay on. One Sunday morning they fall to her ankles right in the middle of town--a public scandal! Mortified, Theo swears to keep her at home until she can find some less unruly undies. Amid this chaos he's trying to rent a room in their flat. The prospective lodgers have some underlying surprises of their own. In The Underpants, Steve Martin brings his comic genius and sophisticated literary style to Carl Sternheim's classic 1910 farce. His hilarious new version was staged by Artistic Director Barry Edelstein, and opened in March '02 on Off-Broadway to critical acclaim.

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Review: The Underpants

User Review  - Kathy Worrell - Goodreads

3.5 stars. This play was originally written in 1910. Steve Martin adds his own flair and republishes it in 2002. I enjoyed this laugh-out-loud farce; it was a fun and entertaining read. I would definitely love to see this as a play. Read full review

Review: The Underpants

User Review  - John Bruni - Goodreads

This one's a quick read. It's the story of Louise, who one day accidentally loses her panties in public during a parade. Her husband Theo thinks she's acting like a slut and thinks this will ruin him ... Read full review

About the author (2002)

Steve Martin is a celebrated writer, actor, and performer. His film credits include Father of the Bride, Parenthood and The Spanish Prisoner, as well as Roxanne, L.A. Story, and Bowfinger, for which he also wrote the screenplays. He's won Emmys for his television writing and two Grammys for comedy albums. In addition to a play, Picasso at the Lapin Agile, he has written a bestselling collection of comic pieces, Pure Drivel, and a bestselling novella, Shopgirl. His work appears frequently in The New Yorker and The New York Times. He lives in New York and Los Angeles.

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