John of Gaunt: the exercise of princely power in fourteenth-century Europe

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Longman, 1992 - Biography & Autobiography - 421 pages
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John of Gaunt (1340 -99), Duke of Lancaster and pretender to the throne of Castile, was son to Edward III, uncle to the ill-starred Richard III and father to Henry IV and the Lancastrian line. The richest and most powerful subject in England, a key actor on the international stage, patron of Wycliffe and Chaucer, he was deeply involved in the Peasant's revolt and the Hundred Years War. He is also one of the most hated men of his time. This splendid study, the first since 1904, vividly portrays the political life of the age, with the controversial figure of Gaunt at the heart of it.

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John of Gaunt: the exercise of princely power in fourteenth-century Europe

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Goodman thoroughly examines the various aspects of the career of John of Gaunt (Duke of Lancaster, son and father of kings, claimant to the Spanish throne). Not really a straightforward biography like ... Read full review

Contents

Gaunt in History
15
The Education of a Prince 134061
28
Rise to Power 136177
42
Copyright

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