The American Journal of International Law (Google eBook)

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Baker, Voorhis & Company for the American Society of International Law, 1922 - International law
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The American Journal of International Law has been published quarterly since 1907 and is considered the premier English-language scholarly journal in its field. It features scholarly articles and editorials, notes and comment by preeminent scholars on developments in international law and international relations, and reviews of contemporary developments. The Journal contains summaries of decisions by national and international courts and arbitral and other tribunals, and of contemporary U.S. practice in international law. Each issue lists recent publications in English and other languages, many of which are reviewed in depth. Throughout its history, and particularly during first sixty years, the Journal has published full-text primary materials of particular importance in the field of international law. The contents of the current issue of the Journal are available on the ASIL web site.
  

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Page 199 - To provide the fullest and most unembarrassed opportunity to China to develop and maintain for herself an effective and stable government...
Page 254 - The jurisdiction of the Court comprises all cases which the parties refer to it and all matters specially provided for in the Charter of the United Nations or in treaties and conventions in force 2.
Page 217 - China to develop and maintain for herself an effective and stable government; (3) To use their influence for the purpose of effectually establishing and maintaining the principle of equal opportunity for the commerce and industry of all nations throughout the territory of China...
Page 318 - And the United States hereby renounce forever, any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure fish on, or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbours of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Page 318 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Page 77 - It is also declared to be the friendly right of each Member of the League to bring to the attention of the Assembly or of the Council any circumstance whatever affecting international relations which threatens to disturb international peace or the good understanding between nations upon which peace depends.
Page 271 - Should any Member of the League resort to war in disregard of its covenants under Articles 12, 13 or 15, it shall ipso facto be deemed to have committed an act of war against all other Members of the League...
Page 267 - If there should arise between members of the League any dispute likely to lead to a rupture which is not submitted to arbitration in accordance with Article 13, the members of the League agree that they will submit the matter to the Council.
Page 267 - In any case under this Article the award of the arbitrators or the judicial decision shall be made within a reasonable time, and the report of the Council shall be made within six months after the submission of the dispute.
Page 188 - The Signatory Powers, to the end that this prohibition shall be universally accepted as a part of international law binding alike the conscience and...

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