Travels in the Kingdom of France (Google eBook)

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messrs. R. Cross, P. Wogan, L. White, P. Byrne, A. Grueber, J. Moore, J. Jones, W. Jones, W. M'Kenzie, and J. Rice, 1793 - Agriculture
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Page 80 - Give a man the secure possession of a bleak rock, and he will turn it into a garden ; give him a nine years lease of a garden, and he will convert it into a desert.
Page 137 - ... he takes it with him into a room, and turns a machine enclosed in a cylindrical case, at the top of which is an electrometer, a small fine pith ball; a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate; from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the length of the wire makes no difference in the effect, a correspondence might be carried on...
Page 78 - Every man has an olive, a mulberry, an almond, or a peach tree, and vines scattered among them; so that the whole ground is covered with the oddest mixture of these plants and bulging rocks, that can be conceived. The inhabitants of this village deserve encouragement for their industry ; and if I were a French minister they should have it.
Page 85 - Such circumstances are political data. We cannot demand all the books of France to be opened in order to explain the amount of circulation in that kingdom : a politician...
Page 281 - ... greater part of the countrywomen in France ; it speaks, at the first sight, hard and severe labour : I am inclined to think, that they work harder than the men, and this, united with the more miserable labour of bringing a new race of slaves into the world, destroys absolutely all symmetry of person and every feminine appearance.
Page 53 - After these two points, all is a blank. You have no parlour to eat in; only a room with two, three, or four beds.
Page 231 - The spectacle of the representatives of twenty-five millions of people, just emerging from the evils of 200 years of arbitrary power, and rising to the blessings of a freer constitution, assembled with open doors under the eye of the public, was framed to call into animated feelings every latent spark, every emotion of a liberal bosom.
Page 103 - France for markets, the quantity of waste land is surprising: it is the predominant feature the whole way. Much of these wastes belonged to the Prince de Soubise, who would not sell any part of them. Thus it is whenever you stumble on a Grand Seigneur, even one that was worth millions, you are sure to find his property desert.
Page 26 - ... a desert compared with those around London. In ten miles we met not one stage or diligence; only two messageries, and very few chaises; not a tenth of what would have been met had we been leaving London at the same hour.

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